All-Butter Pie Crust

by Jill Lightner Prep Time 20 minutes | Makes one 9-inch crustfrom Edible Seattle Fall 2008 1 1/4 cups all-purpose flour 1/4 teaspoon salt 1 stick (4 ounces) unsalted farmstead butter, chilled, cut into 1" dice, and chilled again 4-5 tablespoons water, chilled in fridge Blend flour and salt in a medium mixing bowl. Sprinkle chilled butter cubes into the flour and press into the dry ingredients with your fingertips, blending together until the mixture looks like fresh breadcrumbs or damp sand. Ideally, no lumps of butter any bigger than a pea will remain, nor will you have any dry flour lurking in the bottom of the bowl. Add cold water one tablespoon at a time, blending gently with a large fork, until...

Bacon Macaroni and Cheese

Recipe Courtesy Angie Roberts, BOKAPrep Time 40 minutes | Serves 4 to 6from Edible Seattle Fall 2008 If you're going local, BOKA Executive Chef Angie Roberts recommends using Mt. Townsend Creamery's Trailhead and Seastack cheeses for her creamy, rich macaroni and cheese. 8 ounces elbow pasta, or any other tube-shaped pasta 1/2 teaspoon kosher salt, plus more for cooking pasta 3 1/2 tablespoons unsalted butter 1/2 cup julienned yellow onions 2 tablespoons all-purpose flour 1 1/4 cups dry white wine 2/3 cup heavy cream 7 ounces Gruyère (or similar) cheese, grated 1 1/3-pound piece Brie or other soft ripened cheese, rind removed and sliced 2 tablespoons plus 1 teaspoon chopped fresh thyme 1 tablespoon Dijon mustard 1/8 teaspoon cayenne pepper 1/8 teaspoon...

Cider-Braised Pork with Apples, Onions and Thyme

by Jess ThomsonServes 6 | Prep time: 45 minutes from Edible Seattle Fall 2008 Serve tender slices of braised pork as is, or over a bed of mashed potatoes or couscous, which will sop up the sweet, rich braising liquid. 2 tablespoons all-purpose flour Salt and freshly ground pepper 1 (2.75-pound) tied pork shoulder roast, netting or string intact 1 tablespoon peanut or vegetable oil, plus more, if needed 1 tablespoon olive oil 2 medium leeks, halved lengthwise and cut into half moons 2 cloves garlic, finely chopped 1/2 pound small yellow pearl onions, peeled* 1 tablespoon chopped fresh thyme 3 to 4 cups hard apple cider 1 tart apple, peeled and cubed 1 tablespoon Dijon mustard 1 tablespoon chopped fresh...

Apple Cider Jelly

by Jess Thomson Makes 1 1/2 cups | Time: 3 hours simmering time, plus overnight chilling from Edible Seattle Fall 2008 This New England classic doesn't take much effort on the cook's part. Apple cider is naturally high in sugar, and its pectin makes it gel nicely. Use the jelly as a condiment for roasted meats or toast. Look for a locally-produced cider, such as Rockridge (Country or Tart varieties) or Lattin's Country Cider Mill. 1 gallon natural apple cider Transfer the apple cider to a large soup pot and bring to a boil. Cook at a strong simmer for about 3 hours, or until all that liquid has reduced to about a cup and a half. Strain the liquid into...

razor clam pasta

Razor Clam Linguine

Adapted from the Washington Department of Fish and Wildlife Prep time 30 minutes | Serves 4 (or 2 very hungry people post–razor clamming) from Edible Seattle Fall 2008 If you're not up for the adventure of digging for razor clams, frozen razor clam meat is frequently available at Wild Salmon Seafood Market. One (1-pound) package frozen clam meat makes about 1 1/2 cups chopped clams. 1/4 cup unsalted butter 1/4 cup olive oil 1 cup finely chopped onions 2 cloves garlic, minced Salt and freshly ground pepper 1 cup dry white wine 3/4 pound linguine 1 1/2 cups razor clam meat (see cleaning instructions), chopped into half-inch pieces 1 1/2 teaspoons dried oregano, or 1 tablespoon chopped fresh oregano 1 cup finely chopped fresh parsley (loosely packed, chopped before measuring) Red chili pepper flakes,...

Integrity on a Grand Scale

INTEGRITY ON A GRAND SCALEAngie Roberts of BOKA Kitchen + Bar by Ashley Gartlandphotos by Claire Bloomberg and Jess Thomson As the executive chef at downtown Seattle's BOKA Kitchen + Bar, Angie Roberts has come a long way from her farm girl upbringing in Northern Idaho. And yet this city chef hasn't forgotten her roots. "I like to support local farmers as much as I can, and I actually like to know the people growing the food [I serve]. I grew up on a farm, so I like to stay close to those people," says Roberts as she halves and hollows a batch of bright organic tomatoes to prep them for roasting this morning. But it wasn't solely her childhood that instilled her...

Trustworthy Apple Pie

by Jill Lightner Prep Time 1 hour, 30 minutes, including crustfrom Edible Seattle Fall 2008 To prepare the pie crusts, freeze one as directed in the accompanying crust recipe and roll out a second one into a 10" circle. Brush off excess flour, transfer to a parchment-lined baking sheet, cover with plastic wrap, and refrigerate until firm, at least 20 minutes. This pie requires the apples to be so tart you wouldn't necessarily eat them out of hand. Store-bought Granny Smiths will do if an out-of-season urge hits, but for for best flavor, apple pie is at its very best during local apple season (just like any other fruit pie). 6 cups Gravenstein or Bramley apples, peeled, cored and sliced very thin (5...

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Locally Grown Pie

Pie matters. It's dessert, yes, which all by itself is enough to rate of high importance, but pie is also a symbol of just about everything that is good and true....

Future Agriculturists

FUTURE AGRICULTURISTS by Heidi Broadhead Name: Brett Boyer FFA Club: Elma Year in School: Graduated June 2008 Projects & Contests: Market hogs and cattle, organic hay and vegetables, dairy judging, poultry evaluation, ag. issues, forestry and conservation Career plans: Not sure. Attending Grays Harbor Community College this fall in agribusiness. "People are worried about pesticide use in vegetables, and they also want cheap food. If they're worried about pesticides they need to know what country the food comes from and what the regulations are there." Name: Hannah Gordon FFA Club: Elma Year in School (08-09): Senior Projects & Contests: Market hogs, dairy Career plans: Something in food science"Families who live in the city assume their food comes from the store. I wish...

Finding the Future Farmers of America

FINDING THE FUTURE FARMERS OF AMERICAfirst in a series on modern ag education by Heidi Broadhead photos by Nick Hall At exactly 6:30 p.m., the coliseum goes dark. A deep bass hums as colored spotlights scan the room. An announcer: "Are you rrrrrready for your 2007-2008 FFA State Officers?!" The crowd starts clapping in unison as each of the officers enter. "Yourrrrrrr FFA State President!" The president, a high school senior, enters down an aisle, recites his FFA role: "I am stationed by the rising sun." The other officers follow. Vice President: "I am stationed by the plow." Secretary: "I am stationed by the ear of corn." The president asks for attendance: "8,278 FFA members." That's bigger than most of the hometowns...

Farm Fresh Fuels

FARM FRESH FUELSby Amy Penningtonphotos by Ron del Pozos and SEED During the last scene in the movie Back to the Future, the mad scientist fuels his time-machine-DeLorean by furiously stuffing the tank with garbage. At the time, this was pure comedic genius—who in their right mind would use trash as fuel? In the 21st century, it turns out a number of sensible folks do just that. One man's trash is indeed another's treasure. Coming in many forms, alternative energy has become part of our daily lexicon, and tends to have strong opinions attached to its perceived level of practicality. With gas and food prices steadily on the rise, we are starting to focus our attention on where and how to cut...

Where There Is Chocolate

WHERE THERE IS CHOCOLATEstory and photo by Pat Tanumihardja In a tiny light-filled Victorian on Queen Anne Hill, five women—me included—gathered around the stove in Ivy Chan's modern kitchen. Dressed in a white chef's coat, Chan was stirring granulated sugar in a heavy-bottomed pot for our first lesson of the afternoon—chocolate fleur de sel caramels. "Cook the sugar until the edges start to melt," she instructed as I peered over her shoulder to take a look. Thick, clear syrup started to gather around the edges of the pot and rapidly spread inward in a rippling wave. The transparent syrup soon turned a dark, rich amber. Chan gradually poured in the heavy whipping cream warming on the stove. "Don't let this mixture boil," she...

hops

The Audacity of Hops

It's an alcoholic beverage, lovingly crafted by lifetime artisans, from the fruit of a vine grown in Eastern Washington. No two batches are the same....

Potato Corn Chowder

Recipe courtesy Vincent Felice, of Growing Washington Farm at 21 Acres Time: 35 minutes active time | Makes: 4 servingsfrom Edible Seattle Fall 2008 3 tablespoons butter 3/4 cup finely chopped onion 1 clove garlic, minced 1/4 cup chopped red bell pepper (use Alvarez Farms Mango Sweet peppers when in season) 1/4 to 1/2 teaspoon crushed red pepper (optional) 1 cup frozen corn (use fresh, scraped from the cob when in season) 1 1/2 pounds Yukon Gold potatoes,...

Roasted Brussels Sprouts with Bacon and Apples

by Jess ThomsonServes 6 | Prep time: 15 minutes Roasted in a hot oven with bacon and apple cider vinegar, Brussels sprouts caramelize into an entirely new vegetable. 1 1/4 pound large Brussels sprouts, rinsed 1 1/2 teaspoons olive oil Salt and freshly ground pepper 2 fat slices bacon (about 3 ounces), cut into 1/2" pieces 1 small firm apple, such as Pink Lady, chopped into 1/2" pieces 2 tablespoons apple cider vinegar Preheat the oven to 450 degrees. Using a small, sharp knife, trim the ends off the Brussels sprouts and tear off the loose outer layer of leaves. Place the sprouts in a baking dish or ovenproof skillet. Drizzle the oil over the sprouts, toss to coat, and season...

Fall Harvest Dinner

by Jess ThomsonIn Washington, you never have to look far for great apples, but this time of year, when heritage and heirloom breeds like Bramley's Seedling and Scarlet O'Hara show up at our farmers' markets, the range of flavors make it worthwhile to seek out new varieties wherever you can find them. Try them: Cozy a slivered Cox Orange Pippin or a King David up to your favorite cheese, or toss it into your next apple crisp. You might find yourself smuggling new discoveries into every part of a rainy day dinner party. That's what we did—and from crunchy, nutty radicchio salad, to tender cider-braised braised pork shoulder, to a fall harvest cake with shredded apple folded right into the batter, each...

Guns and Shovels

GUNS 'N' SHOVELS Robots, Volcanoes and How to Dig for Razor Clams by Brendan Kiley photo courtesy ODFW When dawn breaks over the beach, I notice a rivulet of red running down the handle of my shovel, dripping onto the sand. There's a long, shallow gash on the outside of my index finger, red and angry from digging and shoving my arm into gloppy holes, just above the surf, frantically groping through the muck for clams. It should hurt, but it doesn't: Maybe because I got up at 5 a.m. and am barely awake. Or maybe because it's a freezing April morning, snow intermittently falling into the ocean, and my arm is mostly numb, soaked to the shoulder with wet sand...

The Community Table

THE COMMUNITY TABLEby Leslie Ann Brooksphotos by Lara Ferroni It's graduation day at Farestart. Two students are graduating from a sixteen week adult culinary program, and the support in the room is nearly palpable. The dining room (empty just moments ago) is now filled with staff and students who have come to recognize the hard work of these individuals. Fresh baked chocolate chip cookies are passed around. Karla Smith-Jones, the media relations advocate for Farestart tells me, "This is not an easy program. For people coming from environments without community, or from lives with little structure, it's a difficult lifestyle change. They have to be here, on time, every day." The kitchens are host to Farestart's primary endeavor— the sixteen week adult culinary...

Matt Dillon’s Bare Cupboard

MATT DILLON'S BARE CUPBOARDIce Cream, Weird Beans and A Spot Prawn Disasterby Bethany Jean Clementphoto by Kelly O In which Edible Seattle visits the home of a local chef and investigates the contents of their refrigerator and, in some cases, their soul.The cupboard is pretty bare at Matthew Dillon's place. "Chefs don't keep shit in the fridge," he says. He makes dinner for people at the Corson Building (his urban refuge in Georgetown that's poised to challenge the Herbfarm in...

Writing His Own Golden Ticket

WRITING HIS OWN GOLDEN TICKETby Anna Rothphotos courtesy CBC Chocolates Over the past four years, chocolatier Peter Crabtree has started a wholesale truffle business, opened his first retail store/coffeehouse, and invented a strange (but tasty) line of beer-flavored chocolates. Not bad for a kid who just finished his senior year at Poulsbo's West Sound Academy in June. While his friends enjoyed the heady irresponsibility of youth, Crabtree spent adolescent afternoons and weekends working on his fledgling business, CBC Chocolates--raising startup capital,...

Fall 2008 Editor’s Letter

  When it comes to food, autumn doesn't get enough credit. Spring can be frustrating, as it always arrives at least a month after I expect it. Summer—even when it's as gray and chilly as this one—has a certain amount of franticness. There is a compulsion to get fresh ingredients to the table as quickly as possible, and somehow those fresh-n-simple recipes always seem to involve more finicky preparation than, say, a casserole. Autumn lets us slide into our...

Growing Soup

GROWING SOUPby Jenni Pertusetphotos by Jess Thomson and Jenni Pertuset Vincent Felice is recognizable from roughly nine acres away, halfway across fields that make up the "back 18" at the 21 Acres Center for Local Food and Sustainable Living. He's more tightly constructed than when he started farming here a year and a half ago, as if he's contracted, his body leaner and more muscular, even his former explosion of curls now cropped close to his head. More than his build, he's distinguished by his characteristic quick dancing movements, made from a resting pose on the balls of his feet, a farmer's athletic stance. His abundant energy serves him well as director of agricultural programs for Growing Washington. Growing Washington operates several...