zucchini gazpacho

Creamy Herbed Zucchini Gazpacho

by Jess Thomson Serves 4 | Start to finish: 15 minutes from Edible Seattle July/August 2010 When it's too hot to turn on the oven, an easy gazpacho always wins. This version, best made with small, flavorful zucchini, gets its fresh taste from a good hit of mint. Recipe 1 1/2 pounds small zucchini, cut into 1" pieces 1 large clove garlic, chopped 2/3 cup chopped onion 1/4 cup extra virgin olive oil, plus more for serving Salt and freshly ground pepper 1/4 cup chopped fresh mint 1/4 cup chopped fresh basil 2 tablespoons chopped fresh chives 1/2 to 3/4 cup water Steps Puree everything but the water in a food processor until soupy. Add water to achieve desired consistency, season to taste with salt and pepper, and serve with a drizzle of olive oil. Vegan *Gluten-Free *15 minutes...

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Ahead of the Curve

A Conversation with a Restaurateur Who Went Back to the Land AMY PENNINGTON WITH KURT TIMMERMEISTER PHOTOS BY CLARE BARBOZA Kurt Timmermeister used to own a café in Belltown, when all the cool kids lived there. Then he opened a restaurant in Capitol Hill, when all the cool kids lived there. Now he owns a farm on Vashon, where all the cool kids want to live. And he's making cheese so deliciously creamy and ripe (Dinah's Cheese) that all the cool kids want to eat it. So, how has this trendsetter managed to live so quietly for so long? I visited his farm recently to get a look back on his long food history in Seattle and a peek into his future plans. Maximilien...

Two-Step Tomatoes

I've never tried to save tomato seed. Most instructions involve mixing the jelly-like seed with water, fermenting the mixture and other more complicated machinations. Langley shared her two-step, easy-peasy process with me and assured me that even though it's pretty disgusting, it works like a charm....

The Experts

BY LORENE EDWARDS FORKNER Seed Savers Exchange, a non-profit, member supported organization dedicated to saving and sharing heirloom seeds was founded by Diane Ott Whealy and Kent Whealy. The collection began in 1975 when Diane's dying grandfather passed along seed for 2 garden plants, Grandpa Ott's Morning Glory and German Pink tomato, that had been grown and saved by the Ott family ever since they immigrated to the United States from Bavaria in the 1870's. Today, SSE is the largest non-governmental seed bank in the country. It is home to more than 25,000 vegetable varieties from all over the world that might otherwise fade into history were gardeners not willing to preserve these living legacies. Check out a wide world of...

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Going to Seed

Easy ways to save the fruits of your labor BY LORENE EDWARDS FORKNER What if you could bank a bit of summer; put by a lucky charm guaranteed to bring back garden fresh flavor and kitchen wonder next year? Practice some simple backyard natural selection by collecting seed from the best and the brightest of this year's crops and you'll be one step closer to next year's bounty; and it doesn't cost a dime. I asked Leda Langley, my favorite organic farmer, for some expert seed saving tips. Together with her husband Matt and a small crew, Langley Fine Gardens on Vashon Island generates truckloads of delicious organic vegetables which they sell at their roadside farm stand and at the West Seattle Farmer's...

Shopping and Storing

Judge them on their looks Artichokes with green leaves and tightly closed tips are what you're looking for. Avoid artichokes with brown-tinged exteriors as this indicates they've been around for awhile, says Tinsley. Erickson avoids artichokes with curled leaves or extremely hard tips for the same reason. Check the stems Avoid artichokes with shriveled, dark, ridged or spindly stems as this indicates an old, fibrous, less desirable artichoke. Give them a squeeze Both Tinsley and Costello recommend checking the freshness of an artichoke by pressing it ever so slightly. The artichoke should spring back easily. "You don't want to squeeze them and feel air," says Costello. Chill out Artichokes have a short shelf life so it's best to use them within a few days of buying...

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Artichokes

"When I got to Italy and started to understand how versatile artichokes were and what an amazing flavor they have, I was hooked and started experimenting with them on many different levels."...

Rice Varieties

LONG AND SHORT GRAIN VARIETIES Tinawon Fancy Large, separate grains with a firm inner texture. Fragrant, with a mild, sweet aftertaste. Tinawon White Looks like Arborio, with a sturdy texture and strong fragrance and mild flavor. Has been called "the mother of all Arborio types." Kalinga Unoy Reddish color and nutty aroma. The mild but distinct flavor is great with fresh herbs or stongly spiced dishes. This rice is regarded by its farmers as a safeguard against illness. Ulikan Red Slightly sticky long grain rice with a reddish color and earthy cooking aroma. Holds up well to curries and makes a great rice pudding. STICKY RICES Mountain Violet Intense purple color, with a plump grain and nutty flavor. Makes a fine visual and flavor contrast in desserts with coconut milk. Ifugao...

The Long, Long Journey of Fair Trade Rice

BY RENE FEATHERSTONE When you purchase a package of Eighth Wonder rice, it's been places. "Rice is first planted in concentrated seed beds in December; it's transplanted in January and February. Depending on variety and elevation, it's harvested by hand after five to seven months. Old women who're the 'seed keepers' pick out the best panicles first," Mary Hensley says of Cordillera heirloom rice production on terraces. The bundled panicle sheaves are carried to an open area for drying, and then they're put up in wooden granaries on stilts. The estimated yield per hectare is about three tons. Hensley's company contracts with about 250 farmers who each pledge a certain number of 25-kilogram sacks. Since much of the terrace terrain is too steep for...

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Dedicated to Tradition

World heritage farming and heirloom rices BY RENE FEATHERSTONE PHOTOS COURTESY EIGHTH WONDER, Inc. Have you heard of the rice whisperer, the mysterious Lady of Terraces? She arrives in Seattle in her Subaru loaded with seven kinds of rice you've probably not seen before, the grain in hues from ochre to blue-black, tan, even red. Her name is Mary Hensley. Her Eighth Wonder, Inc is based in Ulm, Montana. You meet her when she's offering in-store samples. You taste her offering of rice, your palate surprised by a flavor profile pleasingly complex, the texture robust. When you compliment her, she smiles. She's so soft-spoken you suspect shyness. She's a quiet woman, middle-aged, no bravura. Which makes it all the more astonishing that she's doing her part...

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Riesling’s Renaissance

There's a Riesling renaissance happening in our own backyard. And what a renaissance it is. Today, Chateau Ste. Michelle is the largest single producer of Riesling in the world, and makes up to nine different styles each year...

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Cordials

Cordials are essentially sweetened syrups infused with herbs, spice or plants. They are simple to make and offer a wide range of flavors and essences to anyone willing to experiment....

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Cooking Fresh: Breaking Fast

BY JESS THOMSON It's easy to stuff summer's best produce into lunches and dinners, but I think we too often forget how good vegetables taste first thing in the morning. Plan a Sunday breakfast with friends, and go fancy, starting with a minty zucchini gazpacho. Then fold your garden into a breakfast strata, along with some local chicken sausage, and serve it piping hot, alongside basil-crusted breakfast tomatoes. If you're a hardcore diner breakfast type, skip the formalities and bake up a batch of handheld breakfast bombs—they're bacon-and-egg muffins made by baking an egg directly into the muffin batter. If you time it just right, the egg's center will be just set but still good and gooey when you break into it. Creamy...

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The Pursuit of Pleasure

In a world filled with food porn, we thought it was time for more direct action. BY JAY FRIEDMAN PHOTOS BY RINA JORDAN   Chef Jason Wilson will never look at his customers this same way. Not after our conversation. I am, after all, not just a food writer, but also a sex educator. Jason and his business/life partner Nicole are cuddled close on a banquette at Crush, the restaurant they started based on their romance. When I tell them I want to talk about the connections between food and sex, Nicole says “something special happens here at Crush,” pointing out that the restaurant’s slogan is “arouse your senses.” She and Jason love to witness first dates, proposals, weddings, and anniversaries, and frequently hear from people...

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Kitchen Relationships

Nimbus restaurant's constant search for sources STORY AND PHOTOS BY TIM NEWCOMB In the heart of downtown Bellingham and soaring 14 floors above street level, Nimbus boasts commanding views of Bellingham Bay, downtown, the surrounding countryside and Mount Baker. With such a far-reaching view, you can see almost everywhere your dinner has come from. Nimbus opened in 2003 and Josh Silverman came to work at the restaurant while finishing his culinary degree at Bellingham Technical College. After training in a Michelin-starred restaurant in Spain and then working in Seattle's Earth & Ocean, Silverman, at the age of 30, bought Nimbus in April 2006. While Nimbus was serving local fare at the time, Silverman took the idea to new heights. He changes the menu monthly...

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A Double Scoop of Delicious

Punk rock meets rocky road at full tilt ice cream   BY HEIDI BROADHEAD PHOTOS BY CLARE BARBOZA Justin Cline never planned to be in ice cream. He'd worked as a line cook, and made cheese at Salumi, but he had left the food business several years ago. Then he started experimenting with ice cream flavors at home. "It all happened really fast," says Cline. "We first saw that this place was for rent in April." That was in 2008, when he and his wife Ann first talked about renting the space on 16th Avenue SW near Roxbury in Seattle's White Center neighborhood. They painted the walls, and hung some local art. Both were lonely for the pinball they used to play when Ann lived above...

Recipe Box: Rhubarb Sorbet

Recipe courtesy of Spur Gastropub Serves 6-8 people | Prep time 20 minutes plus chilling and freezing time Recipe 2 cups chopped rhubarb 1 cup sugar 1 cup water A pinch of salt A squeeze of lemon juice Steps Place all ingredients in a pot and cook on medium high until rhubarb is completely tender. Move the mixture to a blender and blend on high until it is completely smooth. Strain and cool the sorbet in the refrigerator for an hour or two until cold. Next, place chilled mixture in an ice cream machine and follow the manufacturer's instructions for sorbet. This should make about 3-4 cups of sorbet and will keep in your freezer for a week or two. If it gets icy, thaw it completely and refreeze it in...

Recipe Box: Vanilla Yogurt Sponge Cake

Recipe courtesy Spur Gastopub Makes 15 cakes start to finish: 1 hour from Edible Seattle July/August 2010 You'll need a whipping cream dispenser for this recipe. This cake has a couple unfamiliar ingredients and techniques, but it's a simple opportunity to play with a bit of molecular gastronomy kitchen techiques at home. The result is delicious--slightly tangy, and a perfect foil to fruit sorbets. Recipe 1/2 cup plus 1/3 cup sugar 3 egg whites 1 egg yolk 1/2 cup canola or vegetable oil 5/6 cup plain, whole milk or Greek yogurt 1/8 teaspoon malic acid 1 teaspoon salt 1 2-inch vanilla bean, split and scraped 1/2 cup + 1 tablespoon pastry flour, sifted Steps In the bowl of a stand mixer, whisk 1/2 cup sugar with the egg whites until soft peaks form. Set aside. In...

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Recipe Box

You go out to dinner, and one of the dishes stuns you with delight. You think about the dish for a week, describe it to all your friends and relations, and, if you're a reasonable home cook, try to whip up something close in your kitchen. You might come close, but it's just not right. The cravings linger. This happens to us all the time. It's not pretty. And we figure we're not alone. So, we've launched Recipe Box, with the intention of collecting your requests, passing them along to the chefs, and posting their results online. We'll run one recipe in each issue of our print magazine, too--the talented Myra Kohn is doing a thorough recipe test and photo shoot for...

Order In

BY JULIA WAYNE When it's hot out, the last thing I want to do is cook from scratch. I find that the ingredients I buy at the farmer's market are generally eaten in exactly the same form in which they were purchased. So, when I want a composed meal, I want someone else to do the cooking. Enter two local companies which deliver gourmet meals featuring locally-sourced food: Eat Local and Got Soup Greg Conner started Eat Local in response to the frustration he felt about not being able to find fast, locally-sourced meals while working as a financial consultant. Rather than indulging in preservative-rich meals which would make him feel sick later, Greg dreamed about organic, delicious meals preserved only by nature's natural preservative:...

Canning Across America

BY JILL LIGHTNER If there is one thing we really want to inspire you to do this summer, it's to try canning. The effort is the rewarding kind, the tasks simple and satisfying, and the final flavors are simply stupendous. Once you experience raspberry jam the way it should be, you will never again be tempted by the giant pot of red-tinted corn syrup, where raspberries are the fifth ingredient, and follow four kinds of cheap sugar sources (yep, that's why white grape juice concentrate is in all those jams—for the cheap, fruit-based sugar). Last year, a few (mostly local) women created Canning Across America, a website that ended up being a fantastic resource for stories, recipes, helpful videos and links to...

Bicycle Sundays

BY JILL LIGHTNER Lake Washington Boulevard is possibly the prettiest route in Seattle for a lazy, kid-friendly bike ride—particularly on Sundays through September. Cosponsored by Seattle Parks and Recreation and the Cascade Bicycle Club, the Bicycle Sundays program closes the street to motorized traffic from 10am to 6pm (a few exceptions are posted on the website), all the way from Mount Baker Beach to the entrance of Seward Park. It's a flat, windy road that travels along the lake—bring a picnic, some binoculars (you'll see a huge variety of ducks, and likely more than one bald eagle) and don't forget your bathing suit. Need a bike helmet—or one that fits properly? The club will be fitting them professionally and selling them for...

Summertime Chevre

So Fresh, So Clean, So Chevre BY JULIA WAYNE All winter, I topped colorful beet salads with tangy fresh chevre from some of my favorite local cheesemakers. Now that it's warmed up, I'm eating this creamy goat's cheese on fresh tomatoes with a touch of balsamic vinegar, brightening up my beloved fennel and orange salads, and spreading it on La Panzanella's Croccantini, drizzled with lavender honey (Red Barn Lavender in Ferndale has a great one). But some folks reject the entire category of chevre. The barnyard taste they report when eating goat's cheese is caused by pheromones released when billy goats are around the does. These pheromones actually get into the milk, causing a funky, "barty" flavor. While the hesitance of the...

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Recipe Box: Tutta Bella’s Bietola Marinata

BY MYRA KOHN Ah, the humble beet. It just doesn't get enough credit. Prepared with care, at the peak of freshness, it can be a revelation. This is one of those rare recipes that will turn beet avoiders into fiends. Just don't feel discouraged by the cooking times. The process, effortless for the most part, and the salad, finished with a sprinkle of toasted pistachios and mounds of creamy goat cheese as a garnish, is as delectable as it is appealing. You'll be craving it like candy! Bietola Marinata recipe courtesy Tutta Bella Neapolitan Pizzeria 8 servings| start to finish: 1 day from Edible Seattle November/December 2011 Recipe 5 lbs. beets (any will do, but a mix of red, golden and Chioggia if possible) 1/4 cup olive oil 2...

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Recipe Box: Almond Crusted French Toast

BY MYRA KOHN Almond Crusted French Toast serves 4-6 | start to finish: 30 minutes Recipe adapted from Urbane Restaurant & Bar Contrary to popular belief it is not the French who created French toast (also known as "pain perdu," meaning lost bread). Its origins can be traced all the way to ancient Rome, when affluent citizens of the empire were big fans of a plate of day-old bread brought back to life by soaking in a simple custard. Centuries later, there are few breakfast items that people seem to love more than French toast. Urbane's version adds aromatics to the custard, a bit of citrus and the nuttiness of almonds. Sweet, savory and not too rich, it will wake up even the sleepiest...

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Recipe Box: Nash’s Organic Carrot Soup

BY MYRA KOHN Most carrot soups out there are too thick, their earthy and green flavor often obscured by a heavy hand of cream and butter. This one is velvety without being too rich, and sweet without being unnaturally cloying. The carrots come from Nash's Organics. They are available at local farmers markets from July to April and their beauty and sweetness are worth seeking out. Nash's Organic Carrot Soup Recipe courtesy of TASTE Restaurant from Edible Seattle July/August 2011 4 servings| start to finish: 60 minutes Recipe 1/4 cup olive oil 1 Walla Walla onion, peeled and diced 1 1/2 tablespoons chopped fresh thyme 2 pounds Nash's carrots, peeled and roughly chopped 1 quart vegetable stock, plus up to 1 cup additional as desired Truffle oil to drizzle 1/2 cup half and...