Binge: Local Soda

BY JESS THOMSON It's clear that our region excels at crafting artisanal foods like cheeses and breads—but outside the farmers markets, the local-means-better ethos extends to sodas, too. Here's a list of our favorites. Since these aren't your typical burger buddies, we've created a drinking guide, so you know what to crack, when. ***COLA: The Porch Drink Fentimans Curiosity Cola, from Burnaby, BC, has a distinctly herbaceous flavor, like old-fashioned Coke, only a little less sweet. Serve in a cold glass,...

Fire Salad

Fire Salad From Edible Seattle July/August 2011Serves 4 | start to finish: 15 minutesI'm not normally the kind of girl who eats a bowl of carrot salad and calls it lunch. (I make fun of those girls.) Tangled together in a mixing bowl, though, this simple, fresh combination of freshly grated carrots (the pre-shredded kind really won't do) and fiery vinaigrette makes me think twice about adding a sandwich. For protein, add chopped peanuts. 2 teaspoons soy sauce2 tablespoons rice vinegar1 tablespoon canola oil1 tablespoon toasted sesame oil1 teaspoon sriracha (or to taste)1 1/2 pounds carrots, peeled and grated (using multicolored...

Crunchy Summer Beans with Mustard and Dill

by Jess Thomsonfrom Edible Seattle July/August 2011Serves 4 to 6 | start to finish: 15 minutes   Here's a green bean recipe with everything: it's got the tang of good Dijon, the crunch of whole grain mustard, and an ease that makes it a realistic choice for quick weeknight dinners. You can toss the beans with the mustard and take them along for a picnic, or arrange the beans on a fancy platter and drape the dressing over the top. 1 1/4 pounds green and/or yellow wax beans, rinsed and trimmed2 tablespoons Dijon mustard2 tablespoons whole-grain mustardJuice of 1 large lemonSalt...

Recipe Box: Nash’s Organic Carrot Soup

BY MYRA KOHNSubmit your own recipe requests to recipebox@edibleseattle.com Most carrot soups out there are too thick, their earthy and green flavor often obscured by a heavy hand of cream and butter. This one is velvety without being too rich, and sweet without being unnaturally cloying. The carrots come from Nash's Organics. They are available at local farmers markets from July to April and their beauty and sweetness are worth seeking out. Nash's Organic Carrot SoupRecipe courtesy of TASTE Restaurantfrom Edible Seattle July/August 20114 servings| start to finish: 60 minutes1/4 cup olive oil1 Walla Walla onion, peeled and diced1 1/2 tablespoons chopped fresh thyme2 pounds Nash's carrots, peeled and roughly chopped  1 quart vegetable stock, plus up to 1 cup additional as...

A Bumper Crop

stress and support systems grow tomatoes worth the effortSTORY & PHOTOS BY BILL THORNESS The Japanese Black Trifele is flowering. Stupice has grown a thick stalk. The Sungold seems to shoot up a foot every day. Those are the July pleasures of your tomato treasures. You're not yet biting into the juicy, tangy fruit, but you can certainly smell it as you brush by the plants that have taken root in your garden. Good trellising and watering techniques can help bring in a bumper crop. ***Banish the Wimpy CageFie on the tomato cage, that's what I say. Whoever thought to weld thin wire rings onto wimpy verticals barely a couple of feet long was not a visionary. That person...

The French Connection

lusting after real meat BY ABRA BENNETTPHOTOS BY MYRA KOHN   Within a week of moving to a small town in France I fell in love with the butcher's wife. It was innocent; we were both happily married and our relationship was strictly platonic, but we met in a meat market, and all we talked abut were breasts, thighs, tails, and cheeks. Although I was an accomplished cook and former personal chef here in the U.S., in France I stood paralyzed in front of the meat counter. Jewel-like cuts of meat, nearly all unfamiliar, some with labels attesting to their origin...

Love and Walnuts

Nocino brings people together—I knew that even before I knew what nocino was. I was sitting in Trattoria Arcari in Colorno, Italy, sipping a sweet dark rich liquid when Mrs. Arcari, her apron still on, sat down next to me....

Lists

BY BECKY SELENGUTI like lists.I used to have this habit of collecting other people’s shopping lists that I’d find abandoned in carts, partially crossed off, or stuck to the floor of the local grocery store aisle. I’d pick them up at farmers markets and shove them deep into my pockets. Later I’d look at them and recreate the lives and meals of the people who wrote them. I like reading shopping lists like soothsayers read tea leaves. I’d see these lists at convenience stores in people’s hands and I’d read them, on the sly, sideways, eluding detection, catching “cigarettes” and...

The Taste of Summer

In the sunshine of the Okanogan, Billy's Gardens produces a sweeter tomato BY TARA AUSTEN WEAVERPHOTOS BY CLARE BARBOZA When I first moved to Seattle from California, I planted tomatoes in spring, only to find them still laden with unripe fruit in September when the rain started again. I was understandably worried. It seemed I had moved to a region where good tomatoes were hard to come by. Had I just given up the bursting sweet-tart flavor that is the culinary symbol of long summer days? That was not a choice I would willingly have made. Hope, for me, was found at the farmers market, in front of the stand for Billy's Gardens. There crates were piled high with shiny red fruit, smooth...

Greening the Culture

why the next four years are critical for Yesler TerraceBY HEIDI BROADHEADPHOTOS BY DELLA CHEN On a rainy Saturday in March, the resilient Yesler Terrace Urban Demonstration farm, like the neighboring Freeway P-Patch garden and other spots around the soon-to-be-redeveloped Yesler Terrace neighborhood, showed the first signs of spring. That morning, a small crew of volunteers harvested the remaining winter greens and walked them up to the Food Not Bombs drop at the Yesler Terrace community center, where youth leaders from the GroundUp Organics program have been delivering fresh produce every Saturday at noon since June 2010. In the afternoon, volunteers planted some cabbage, broccoli, and cauliflower starts donated from a recent Tilth plant sale. Program Director Karen Toering, who has been...

A Perfect Picnic

BY JESS THOMSON Because it's hard to improve on nature this time of year, we came up with a few salads that get right to the point. Start by blending cherry tomatoes, the classic harbingers of true summer, with corn, basil, and bacon, for a breadless take on a BLT that distills the season into spoonfuls. For a picnic that pleases all types, serve the salad alongside the others here, or turn each one into a meal: The green beans, napped with a crunchy, tangy mustard seed sauce that will please traditionalists, make the perfect base for a salmon nicoise. Pair the Indian twist on potato salad, crunchy with curry, coriander, and dill seeds, with lamb kebabs, or top simply grilled fish...

Why the Chenin Blanc is a Grape Worth Saving

Chenin Blanc is sometimes referred to as the 'queen of grapes' in France's Loire Valley. There the grape goes into a dazzling array of wines from sparkling Crémant de Loire to the dry wines of Savennières to the sweet and off-dry wines of Vouvray....

The Unlikely Oasis

farm-to-table cuisine comes to SeatacBY REBEKAH DENNPHOTOS BY LARA FERRONILess than a mile away, the jumbo jets fly supplies into SeaTac Airport: Berries from Chile, shrimp from Thailand, New Zealand lamb, edamame from China, mangos, bananas. Mark Bodinet and Roy Breiman don't need any of it. At Copperleaf, their 28-seat restaurant, the chefs rely on lamb from Arlington's 90 Farms, on shellfish from Puget Sound, mushrooms from foragers and from the mycelium layered with damp straw and wood chips on their own SeaTac grounds. Copperleaf opened last year smack in suburbia, located on an 18-acre oasis a few blocks from an airport Motel Six. It sounds like an unlikely spot for a "refined farm menu" sourced mostly from a 100-mile radius, featuring...

OUR AVAS- Columbia Valley

There was a problem to solve three decades ago, when Chateau Ste. Michelle's Bob Betz was doing his road show to promote Washington State wines, and regularly fielded questions (from well-meaning but clueless listeners) along the lines of, "On what bank of the Potomac do you grow your grapes?"...

Urban Foraging

BY JILL LIGHTNERCommunity Supported BakeryWe're fans of both Columbia City Bakery and the community supported agriculture business model where customers sign up for farm "shares" and receive a weekly box of produce, so when they introduced a "CSB" based on the CSA concept, it felt like genius. Customers can sign up to participate in a six-week program where they'll receive a weekly package of baked goods; the commitment is to spend a minimum of $100 over that six-week period, divided in whatever way suits you best. Favorite breads like walnut levain and pain de champagne are available, along...

Editor’s Letter

Some seasons are more dramatic than others. In the space of a few weeks this spring—let's not forget, the coldest spring on record—there were celebratory book launches for several contributors, readers flooded us with compliments on Lara Ferroni's beautiful cover photo for our last issue, I was in a car accident, Edible Communities won a James Beard Foundation award for Best Publication (congratulations to all 70 of us), and Seattle lost our brilliant and deeply beloved ball of energy, Kim Ricketts. It felt like at least half of April's showers were tears.A helpful aspect of living seasonally is...