Cristina’s Homemade Flour Tortillas

by Cristina Zurita CenicerosMakes one dozen 10" tortillas | Prep Time 20 minutesfrom Edible Seattle March/April 2009 Like pie crust, great tortillas get easier with practice. And just like any homemade bread, good homemade tortillas are exponentially better than storebought. 3 cups all-purpose flour (you can use up to 1 1/2 cups whole wheat flour) 1 1/2 teaspoons baking powder 1 1/2 teaspoons salt 1/2 cup shortening, room temperature (Cristina prefers the non-hydrogenated Spectrum) 1 cup water, heated to boiling point in a saucepan and set Whisk together the flour, baking powder, and salt. Rub in the shortening with your fingers until the mixture resembles heavy, damp sand. Making sure the water is as hot as you can tolerate, add about 1/3 cup...

Cheddar-Ale Soup

by Jess Thomson Serves 4 | Prep time: 45 minutesFrom Edible Seattle March/April 2009 Serve topped with sourdough croutons or crumbled bacon. 1/2 stick (4 tablespoons) unsalted butter 1 medium onion, finely chopped 2 cloves garlic, chopped 1/4 cup all-purpose flour 1 1/2 teaspoons dry mustard 2 cups whole milk, room temperature 1 (15-ounce) can chicken broth 1 (12-ounce) bottle amber or pale ale 1 pound good sharp cheddar cheese, grated Salt and freshly ground pepper Worcestershire sauce, to taste Melt the butter in a large soup pot over low heat. When melted, add the onion, and cook and stir for 10 minutes, until the onion is clear. Add the garlic, flour, and mustard, and cook and stir for one...

Cream of Nettle and Sorrel Soup

By Jess Thomson Serves 4 as an appetizer | Prep time: 30 minutesFrom Edible Seattle March/April 2009  For a vegan soup, substitute 2 tablespoons olive oil for the butter and 1/2 cup water for the cream. 2 tablespoons unsalted butter1 small leek, cleaned and chopped1 shallot, chopped1/2 pound nettles, cooked and squeezed dry*1 packed cup sorrel (about 3/4 ounce)4 cups vegetable or chicken broth3/4 cup heavy creamSalt and freshly ground pepper Melt the butter over medium-low heat in a heavy soup pot. When melted, add the leeks and shallots, and cook, stirring frequently, until soft, about 10 minutes. Add the nettles, sorrel, broth, and cream, season with salt and pepper, and bring to a boil. Reduce heat and simmer for 10 minutes. Remove...

Chanterelle Cashew Cheese Celeriac Ravoili

recipe courtesy of Colin Patterson, Sutra Serves 6 | One day non-active time for cheese; 35 minutes for ravioliFrom Edible Seattle March/April 2009 1 cup raw cashews 1 teaspoon lemon juice 1/2 of a medium onion, chopped fine 2 cloves garlic, chopped 2 cups sliced chanterelles 1/2 cup basil, julienned 2 cups balsamic vinegar 2 medium celery roots Black truffle oil for drizzling Cashew Cheese Soak cashews in 2 cups purified water for at least six hours and up to 12 hours. After soaking, blend cashews with lemon juice to form smooth puree, place in glass container and let sit at room temperature for 24 hours to slowly ferment. Ravioli Filling Sautee onions until slightly caramelized, add garlic and chanterelles, and sautee...

Green Chili Pork

Courtesy Tamara Murphy of Brasa and Elliott Bay Bookstore CafeServes 6 from Edible Seattle March/April 2009 For the SauceIn summertime, use fresh poblanos and tomatillos. With fresh ingredients, blanch the tomatillos in hot water for 60 seconds, and roast, peel and seed the poblanos. The extra flavor is worth the effort. Alvarez Farms sells organic peppers and tomatillos in season. 2-4 jalapenos, depending on how spicy they are (use the seeds for extra heat) 4-6 cloves of peeled garlic 32-ounce can of tomatillos (drained), or about 8 cups fresh, blanched tomatillos 4 cups canned green chili, or 4 cups roasted, peeled and seeded poblano peppers 4 bunches fresh cilantro In a large bowl combine all ingredients. In small batches,...

The Clover and the Oyster

THE CLOVER AND THE OYSTERHOW ONE 4-H CLUB COULD CHANGE A TOWN'S FUTURELAST IN A SERIES ON MODERN AG EDUCATIONby Heidi Broadheadphoto courtesy WSU extension Around the turn of the last century, experimental field stations at land-grant universities were having trouble getting local farmers to accept new technologies. In 1902, A.B. Graham, a school superintendent in Ohio, set up a "Boys' and Girls' Agricultural Club." The hope was that the 85 kids who signed up would get excited enough about agriculture to recruit their parents to the new methods. Soon, corn clubs and canning clubs started popping up throughout the Midwest and the South. "Those canning clubs were as attuned to the latest technology as we are today," says Pat BoyEs,...

Snack and Relax

SNACK AND RELAXENJOYING THE MARKET WITH YOUR KIDSby Jenni Pertusetphoto by Carole Topalian Every Sunday I navigate the farmer's market, dashing about for the week's food with a 3-year-old by my side. I love the market I frequent, with its two-story-tall purple, orange and red flags, its low hum of conversation, its cold-weather smell of wood smoke, coffee, and grilled sausages. I value the fresh food and the friendships I've developed buying directly from the people who produce it. And I enjoy being there with my daughter, who has her own favorite farmers and foods. But keeping the girl from dashing toward traffic, or from snatching half a wheel of cheese (again) can leave me feeling frazzled. Other parents don't seem as harried....

Liquid Assets: The Cocktail Craft

THE COCKTAIL CRAFTby Paul Clarkephoto by Kelly O "The cheapest and easiest way to become an influential man and be looked up to by the community at large, [is] to stand behind a bar, wear a cluster-diamond pin, and sell whisky," Mark Twain wrote in Roughing It, the chronicle of his 1860's Western experiences. "Youthful ambition hardly aspired so much to the honors of the law, or the army and navy, as to the dignity of proprietorship in a saloon." Things have certainly changed. Once positioned near the social pinnacle in many American communities, bartenders saw their vocation criminalized during Prohibition. Today tending bar is typically considered a job, not a profession; but in a nation that's embracing sweeping culinary changes,...

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The Simple Art of Homemade Tortillas

Cooks who believe in the phrase "easy as pie" will have no problem when Cristina Zurita Ceniceros says that making flour tortillas is as simple as throwing together a pie crust....

Cooking Fresh: Spring Soups

By Jess Thomson It's almost spring—time for new starts, and cleaner basements, and in Seattle, the smallest beginnings of farmers' spring favorites. The market might not look like much these days, but get closer: Under those drizzly tents, you'll find short-lived spring gems like lemony sorrel, new baby leeks, early greens, and stinging nettles (which aren't nearly as aggressive as they sound, I promise). The weather still screams soup! We can't change that, unfortunately. But with nature's first signs of life—and a few winter market stand-bys, like local shellfish, meats, beans, and grains—we can stir up delicious, warming meals that also promise we'll eventually see the sun. Cream of Nettle and Sorrel Soup Spring Shellfish Stew Cheddar-Ale Soup White Bean, Chard and Farro Stew...

On the Water: Family Fishmonger

THE FAMILY FISHMONGER by Amy Grondinphoto by Kelly O By trade I'm a commercial salmon fisherman. The work is hard, yet thoroughly rewarding. The motions of fishing are repetitive, allowing my mind to wander while my hands are busy with fish. When I am working on the water there are two things that I day dream about: My next meal simmering away in the galley, and the next country I will visit after the fishing season is done. Fish are...

In the Kitchen: Sutra

CONNECTED CUISINEBy Megan HillPhoto by Lara Ferroni Colin Patterson told himself he'd never cook in a conventional restaurant again. After cooking in a number of restaurants, he felt guilty and angered at the waste and "non-yogic actions" of most restaurants. The bags of garbage, the bustle, and the closed kitchens added up to "wasted food, wasted energy and lack of connection with the environment." "I had no real desire to enter the restaurant world again," he said. "It was eating at my conscience." That changed when the opportunity came to run a different, more conscientious kind of restaurant. Patterson was teaching yoga full time when his landlord approached him with a house for rent. The landlord thought Patterson might use the space for...

Field and Forest: Edible Trees

EATS SHOOTS AND LEAVES PUGET SOUND'S EDIBLE TREES By Sumi Hahn Photo by Lara Ferroni   Arthur Lee Jacobson once threw a party where all the food came from trees. "Retsina wine, birch beer, pine nuts, apples and oranges, pecans, coconuts. People could bring things if the items fell within certain parameters." A well-known Seattle plant expert, Jacobson further explains. "Trees produce something that's edible, like an apple or orange. Or an edible product that has to be shelled or husked, like a pine nut, or an olive, which has to be processed elaborately. There's also tree sap, like maple syrup from the Sugar Maple." Streamlined and streaked with gray, Jacobson has that slightly off-kilter otherworldliness typical of people who spend most...

Farm to Table: Lattin Lover

LATTIN LOVERby Anna Rothphoto by Jill Lightner You will want to be at Lattin's Cider Mill when the apocalypse comes, and not just because of the amazing apple cider donuts. The mother-daughter trio that runs the joint knows a thing or two about survival. To visit their homey compound in Olympia—equal parts apple cider mill, working farm, petting zoo, commercial bakery and vegetable garden—is to step back in time to an era when "pickle" was a verb and women had...

Icebox: Tamara Murphy

PORK, PICKLED PEPPERS, PINK WINE AND PIE THE GENIUS OF TAMARA MURPHY by Bethany Jean Clement photo by Kelly O In which Edible Seattle visits the home of a prominent Pacific Northwest chef and reports on the contents of their refrigerator, snacks served, lessons about perfection, meat-sharing endeavors and other miscellany. THE SUBJECT: Tamara Murphy, celebrated Seattle chef/restaurateur and famous/infamous chronicler of raising and killing pigs on her Life of a Pig blog. Murphy's Belltown restaurant Brasa turns 10 years old this March, achieving landmark status in the restaurant landscape. Meanwhile, she's getting another Seattle landmark sorted out by taking over the café at the Elliott Bay Book Company. This meeting of the literary and culinary minds is cause for civic celebration: The city's beloved bookstore...

From Cows to Curds

FROM COWS TO CURDS One man's dream works backwards and ends up forward-thinking by Amy Pennington photo by Carole Topalian On the way home from a Christmas party in 2002, Kurt Dammeier walked past a vacant corner building with floor to ceiling windows in the Pike Place Market and thought, 'I'm going to bring cheesemaking to the people!' Not necessarily what the average person might think upon seeing such prime real estate, but then, Dammeier is no average man. For the past ten years he has invested locally in small food companies, such as Pasta & Co and Pyramid Brewery. He'd been mulling over the idea of cheesemaking for a few years when he walked by the vacant windows, going so far...