Toasted Coriander Lemon Aioli

serves 4-6 | start to finish: 5 minutes Ingredients 1 teaspoon minced garlic Juice and zest from 1 lemon 1 tablespoon Dijon mustard 2 teaspoons freshly toasted and ground coriander 1/2 teaspoon turmeric 1 egg yolk salt and pepper to taste 1 cup olive oil Recipe Combine everything but the oil in a blender and mix on low until smooth. Slowly stream in the olive oil until you have a thick, creamy emulsion. dairy-free • vegetarian • 15 minutes or less Recipe courtesy Robin Leventhal ...

Legume Lovin’

the dynamic presence and charming colors of Palouse-grown pulses BY SARA JONES March has reared her soggy head, asparagus is nearly back in sight, and we’re all craving edible signs of spring—not the preserved fare that got us through the winter. Well, tell yourself that good things come to those who wait, and use this transitional time of year to learn about a delicious little secret from the browner side of the state: the colorful but quiet soldiers that dry like champions to feed us all year long. I’m talking about legumes—and a co-op of farmers in the Palouse who are putting the chic in chickpea. This could be a love story about taste alone. As local chefs attest, these...

What We Can Do

What We Can Do Most of the recommendations of the Blue Ribbon Panel involve research and monitoring. Because the scale we’re talking about is global, it’s difficult to see the actions of one individual as worthwhile. Along with keeping your personal carbon footprint low, think about ways to make meaningful impact on both industrial operations and regional city management. Reduce global carbon dioxide emissions, and as individuals, do everything possible to reduce fossil fuel use. This can encompass everything from driving a car with great gas mileage to ditching the car entirely and using alternative transportation. Consider fossil fuel usage in leisure activities—try a canoe rather than a jetski, and participate in carbon offset programs when flying or driving long...

Dropping Acid

the science behind and impact of ocean acidification BY ABRA BENNETT PHOTOS BY ABRA BENNETT AND SHEL HALL Is the barrage of news of world-wide catastrophe getting you down? Does the specter of past-the-tipping-point climate change make you want to throw in the towel? Is the vanishing rain forest causing you to despair? Or are you paying more attention to how recently-legalized marijuana is going to be taxed than to where your next oyster is coming from? What if you learned that every tree cut down in the Amazon basin threatens the wild oyster population in Puget Sound? That the same things that are causing unprecedented human contributions to global climate change are also causing  our oceans to  turn...

Tamale Heaven

a hands-on class in El Centro de la Raza’s kitchen BY JILL LIGHTNER PHOTOS BY TAYLOR SKOGLUND I am new to the world of tamales for straightforward reasons. First: My Scottish/Mennonite heritage is not conducive to anything remotely resembling the tamale as a food tradition. Second: Of all the places I’ve lived, the closest I got to tamales as a regional dish was grits, during my years in the Virginia swamps. Third: Whenever there’s a discussion about Seattle Mexican food, the nicest people offer damning-with-faint-praise statements like “almost as good as the dish I loved in Houston” or “the closest to authentic I can find this far north.” The meaner ones say things along the lines of “don’t bother.”...

You’re the Tool

BY BECKY SELENGUT Occasionally I get hired by clients to streamline their kitchens. “Streamline” is a nice way of saying that I get to chuck someone else’s useless kitchen gadgets, replacing the redundant or ridiculous stuff with classic, quality tools. It’s great fun for me and sometimes tolerable for the client. A good sense of humor is a must. I typically separate out the stuff into three piles: the first is for essentials; the second for items to donate; the third is the Pile of Regrets. If I sense a client seems sad that I’ve fast tracked their battery-operated egg scrambler...

Noodles and Duck Feet

the intense, cost-effective flavors of LloydMartin BY SONJA GROSET PHOTOS BY RINA JORDAN Chef Sam Crannell doesn't hunt or fish. He's not even particularly outdoorsy. Yet wild game and foraged foods feature predominately on the menu of Crannell's fledgling Queen Anne restaurant LloydMartin. "I've eaten enough chicken and ground beef in my life. I want food to taste like something.” And indeed, Chef Crannell’s food does taste like something: pungent, yet refined; bold, yet simple. None of the flavors...

C.B.’s Nuts

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Urban Foraging

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Editor’s Letter

Blame it on the daffodils. They pop those cheery heads out of the mud and trick us all into thinking that edible spring has sprung. My “tête à tête” blossoms appear and every darn year I immediately start looking around for local asparagus. I know perfectly well they’re not ready for harvest, yet still I look and hope. When rhubarb, that other sure sign of spring, finally arrives, I hear market customers ask the farmer when his strawberries will be in. The honest answer for the last couple of years would be a belly laugh and a “come see me on July 4th!” but farmers are generally better salesmen than that. Kurt Vonnegut described this season as “Unlocking”—a time...