Easy Ginger Mousse with Honey and Toasted Coconut

Serves 6 | start to finish: 3 1/2 hours (active time: 20 minutes) A mousse can serve as a refreshing end to a boldly flavored meal. It takes a few hours of foresight but, because there are no eggs, this is a comparatively easy and foolproof recipe. What you trade in ease, however, you lose in durability. It’s best to assemble this dessert right before serving, though it can withstand some time in the refrigerator if already spooned into serving cups. Do add the toasted coconut flakes right before serving, as they tend to absorb moisture and get soggy. Washington blackberry honey tastes wonderful with the ginger, but any favorite local honey will hit the spot. For the Greek yogurt, Nancy’s now...

Red Curry with Oregon Shrimp and Swiss Chard

Serves 6 | start to finish: 25 minutes Certified sustainable by the Marine Stewardship Council, Oregon bay shrimp has a mild, sweet flavor that harmonizes beautifully with this simmering, spicy curry. These tiny shrimp are previously peeled and cooked, making them ideal for whipping up a quick meal. They are often sold still a bit frosty, so if this is the case, extend the simmer time accordingly. If chard is not available, spinach makes a wonderful substitute—or try this with the first of our springtime nettles. The rich coconut milk and the tender bits of sweet shrimp make this dish feel like an indulgent treat. 2 cups dry jasmine rice, for serving with the curry 1 tablespoon canola or coconut oil 1/4 cup chopped...

Sweet Chili Roasted Broccoli

Serves 6 | start to finish: 20 minutes Roasting vegetables works magic. Contact with the hot pan creates caramelization, and the dry heat concentrates flavors. Even less flavorful stems become a joy to eat. Add garlic and sweet chili sauce and you might have a duel with forks over who gets the last, tasty bite. 1 1/2 pounds broccoli (three to four medium stalks) 3 tablespoons canola oil or other high-heat oil 1/4 teaspoon kosher salt 1 tablespoon lime juice 1 medium garlic clove, finely minced or pressed 1 teaspoon fish sauce (use soy sauce for a vegetarian version) 1 tablespoon Thai sweet chili sauce, such as Mae Ploy Preheat oven to 425°F. Tear any small leaves from the stems of the broccoli and reserve them for later. Cut the...

Lemongrass Soup with Rhubarb and Radishes

Serves 6 | start to finish: 25 minutes Spring ingredients liven up this traditional Thai soup. Chopped pieces of local rhubarb soften and melt into the broth, providing an additional pop of sour among the already bright flavors, and the radishes add a satisfying crunch and contrast to the tender chicken and mushrooms. When served over rice, this soup could stand on its own as a solid lunch or simple dinner. Best of all, this light and bold soup is a snap to make. After prepping the ingredients, simply bring everything to a boil, cover the pan, and steep it for 10 minutes like a pot of tea. You now have soup. The key is to cube the chicken small enough, and...

Thai Game

Spring in the Northwest is a slow starter, but with increasing brightness and lengthening days, people start feeling playful. There are crocuses and daffodils popping up in the parks, fresh produce in the market, and the heady feeling of a new season. Let’s have fun and play a little. For us, nothing says playful like the flavor profiles of Thailand and surrounding areas. Sweet, sour, spicy, and salty is a game where you get to pick your own hand. How hot do you like it? How sweet? We’ve given you reliable guidelines, but feel free to customize for your palate. The right balance is the one you like the most. Here the traditional sweet and sour Tom Yum soup gets a Northwest...

Corn-Millet Muffins with Roasted Red Peppers and Feta

If you’re anything like me, you may feel that corn muffins are often dry and a bit dutiful. These muffins will change your mind. They comfortably straddle the line between sweet and savory, and are packed with flavor thanks to the feta cheese and roasted red peppers. Plus, who can quibble with the bonus of whole-grain nutrition from the spelt flour, cornmeal, and millet (which gives each muffin their delightful crunch). These are always a crowd favorite. makes: 10-12 muffins | start to finish: 1 hour (active time: 15 minutes) 1 1/2 cups (195g) spelt flour 1 cup (165g) medium-grind cornmeal 1/2 cup (100g) raw millet 3 tablespoons natural cane sugar (like turbinado) 1 1/2 tablespoons baking powder 1 1/4 teaspoon kosher salt 2 large eggs, beaten 1 cup...

Chocolate-Cherry Hazelnut Cookies

These cookies are soft and slightly crumbly with a surprising crunch from the millet and a sweet fragrance thanks to the coconut oil. The whole grain flour and natural sugars make them feel almost virtuous as an afternoon snack or late morning pick-me-up while the bits of chocolate and hazelnuts give them sophistication worthy of your next special occasion. makes: 15 Cookies | start to finish: 45 minutes (active time: 15 minutes) 1 cup (170g) whole-wheat flour 3/4 cup (105g) all-purpose flour 1/3 cup (65g) raw millet 1/3 cup (60g) natural cane sugar (like turbinado) 1/2 teaspoon baking powder 1/4 teaspoon ground ginger 1/4 teaspoon ground cinnamon 1/2 teaspoon kosher salt 1/2 cup (120ml) coconut oil, melted and slightly cooled 1 large egg, beaten 2 tablespoons honey 1 teaspoon pure vanilla extract 3/4 cup...

Millet: An Unexpected Pantry Superstar

BY MEGAN GORDON I truly settled in and became at home in my own kitchen the moment I discovered baking with whole grains. Originally the change was inspired by a focus on health and a desire to avoid refined ingredients, but today the impetus is as much driven by the exciting flavors and textures each grain brings to the table. Instead of just grabbing white all-purpose flour for baking, I love the challenge of deciding which flour would make for the most interesting, complex muffin or cookie, given the ingredients I'm using, and sometimes even the season. Today I'm excited to share with you a few recipes that have been gracing our table this spring, each using my all-time favorite grain:...

Sabzi Polow: Persian Herbed Rice

Serves 6 | start to finish: 4 hours (active time: 45 hour) One of the best parts of Persian rice dishes is the toasty crust called tadigh that develops on the bottom. Sometimes this is achieved using a sheet of lavash bread or sliced potatoes, this version relies on rice. Keep an eye (and ear) on the pot to make sure it doesn’t burn. If you do manage to achieve quality tadigh, serve the pieces on top for all to enjoy. Traditionally this dish would include green garlic, which is hard to find in the Northwest in March. Adele Merati recommends tucking in a few garlic cloves to add the appropriate flavor. 4 cup basmati rice 2 teaspoons salt 4 tablespoons canola oil 1/2 cup water 6...

Celebrating Spring

Family and feasting at Persian New Year BY TARA AUSTEN WEAVER Growing up in Seattle, Nazila Merati always knew when it getting close to Persian New Year. “All of a sudden there would be plates covered in muslin left in the sunny spots around the house,” she said. “That’s how I knew things were beginning.” The plates held wheat, mung beans, and lentils, which were being sprouted for the traditional New Year’s altar, the Haft Sin. The sprouted grains and beans, as well as the thorough spring-cleaning her mother undertook, were the first signs of the approaching holiday. The next sign was the baking. “My mother made rice flour cookies, chickpea flour cookies, baklava, almond and walnut macarons,” Nazila remembers. “She would start making them...

Reclaiming the Donut

How “olykoeks” went from the kitchen to coffee shop BY BETH MAXEY I remember the exact moment I realized it was possible to make donuts at home. My mom was reading one of The Little House on the Prairie books to my sister and me. The men had gotten up before sunrise to tend to the animals and the women were making a breakfast like I’d never heard of before: bacon and coffee and eggs and pancakes with maple syrup and butter and porridge and donuts, fried at home, on the stove, in lard. I turned to my mom. “You can’t make donuts at home.” She cocked her head at me, like she didn’t quite understand. “Sure you can,” she said. “I used...

The Call of the Nettles

BY WREN JONES The call goes out early in spring: "Are you busy? The nettles are up." No one says no. Nettles are the first ritual of spring. We meet in a parking lot near the woods: bags, scissors, gloves in hand. There is a thermos of nettle tea, an infusion made from the dried leaves of the previous year. Steeped in hot water the brew is vegetal and brisk, it warms us up on this still early spring morning. The woods are at that turning point: pale fresh growth coming through the rotting layers of winter. The dark is giving way to the light, the new triumphs over the old. We step carefully, avoiding mud and muck, looking for the serrated leaves of...

Farm to Computer to Table

Janelle Maiocco, in her Seattle backyard with some of her flock, seeks to use technology to close the food-purchasing gap. Farmstr uses technology to connect local food producers and consumers STORY BY REBEKAH DENN PHOTO BY TARA AUSTEN WEAVER Janelle Maiocco’s father grew up on a dairy farm in Whatcom County, and she often visited as a child. “I’m familiar with the smell of manure,” she said. “I put in my time in the berry fields.” The land was sold, though, one of hundreds of small Washington dairy farms that couldn’t survive the economics of modern farming. And that was just one of the twists and turns in the Seattle woman’s life that led her to co-found Farmstr.com, an online business connecting small and medium-sized...

The Flavors of Home

Xinh Dwelley blends the freshest seafood with the spices of Vietnam STORY BY TARA AUSTEN WEAVER PHOTOS BY KELLY CLINE As a child growing up in southern Vietnam, Xinh Dwelley never expected to run a seafood restaurant. Growing up she never even did any cooking. “My mother did all the cooking,” she explains. “I went to work in the rice fields with my father.” It’s just one of the surprising aspects of her life. “Eventually I got old enough to make rice,” Dwelley says, “but it was hard. We were cooking over fire and you had to get the charcoal exactly right. I was always burning it or making it too watery,” she laughs. She didn’t start cooking until she found herself working in...

Rise of the Rhone

The vineyards of Syncline Wine Cellars, where James Mantone grows the Rhone varietal Mourvèdre...

Jonboy Caramels

If there ever was an edible that embodied the principle of “less is more,” it’s Jonboy Caramels....

Urban Foraging

  Pok Pok Without the Drive Seeing that we’ve driven Portland just to have dinner at Pok Pok, Andy Ricker’s cult favorite restaurant, we were delighted to hear he had a cookbook in the works. The wait is over and our Thai favorites are now between two covers. But this cookbook is more than just a collection of recipes. Part memoir, part travelogue, all Thai food manifesto, this book will give you an education in words and gorgeous photos (so you know what a betel leaf actually looks like). Now, instead of a three-hour drive, we can head to our own kitchen and whip up batches of laap, naam phrik plaa thuu, and phat si ew. Our gas budget—and our stomachs—will be...

Letter from the Editor

When I stepped in as editor of Edible Seattle, the first thing I worried about was how on earth I could possibly replace Jess Thomson, our Cooking Fresh columnist of six years. Starting with the very first issue, Jess worked hard to develop tempting recipes for us, she set the flavor of the magazine. While she was developing recipes for us, she was also developing a thriving career as a cookbook author. We’re sorry to see her step down, but we’re enjoying the books she is putting out in the world: Pike Place Market Recipes, Top Pot Hand-Forged Doughnuts, Dishing up Washington, and there’s a new collaboration with Renee Erickson in the works. But how to replace her? The Cooking Fresh column is...