Penne with Asparagus and Salmon-Dill Cream

Serves: 4 start to finish: 20 minutes from Edible Seattle May/June 2011 As far as pastas with cream sauce go, this is about as light as it gets. And because it's made with inexpensive lox ends—the bits and corners of salmon lox that many stores and producers trim off to make the filets look snazzier on a brunch platter—it's a relatively cheap way to make a fancy-looking dish. For something a little more decadent, increase the cream by 1/4 cup and stir in 4 ounces crumbled goat cheese at the end. Of course, you can use regular lox, but we'll...

Urban Foraging

West Coast Road EatsA couple years ago, Anna Roth’s story about Seattle sourdough won an EDDY award for historical writing. We know she can write, that she’s something of a history nerd, and that she’s good with the details. She’s also willing to drive miles out of her way for a great fried oyster. It’s not surprising that her food-centric travel guide is thorough, smart, entertaining, informative and deeply useful.Most of the travel is geared towards I-5, from the border to southern California, with occasional side trips to check out the coastal Highway 101 and various wine and agricultural areas. Each section includes a basic map and information about the best and worst times to visit and helpful tidbits of...

If Not Now, Then Wenatchee

This wind-blown stretch of the mighty Columbia creates tasty wine and hard cider, roasts incredible coffee, inspires talented chefs, and has sprouted a CSA program and market with a downright thrilling dream....

Critter Control

Nothing is more annoying than discovering something other than ourselves is eating its way through the vegetable patch. Our every inclination is to launch an all-out assault with an eye toward complete eradication, but this is an unsustainable and dangerous approach loaded with severe collateral environmental damage....

The Fate of A FareStart Student

ed. note: Chris's profile on Joey will be in our May/June print edition. Upon word of his death in early April, we posted the complete story here as it will appear in our magazine, including the original title. Our deepest condolences to Joey's friends and family. Joey Brewer spoke with optimism this winter as he described his ambitions for The Swinery, the deli and butcher in West Seattle. Brewer also spoke candidly of a past checkered with drug addiction and felony arrests. But he...

Follow The Food

a Bainbridge Island love story BY ABRA BENNETT PHOTOS BY SHEL HALL   The first things you notice about Chef Brendan McGill, before you taste a bite of his food, are...

Binge: Salt

BY JESS THOMSON So yes, we're impressed that The Herbfarm, which has always been devoted to eating locally, has experimented with making its own sea salt from different regions of Puget Sound. But we can't all boil seawater down at home, which leaves us looking for other interesting ways to season our food. Luckily, there are a few great Seattle-area companies that harvest the world's best salts and flavor them with local ingredients. If you're up for a road trip, head down to The Meadow in Portland, where "selmelier" Mark Bitterman has curated a baffling collection of salts. SECRET STASH SEA SALTS Secret Stash uses hand-harvested sea salt to make a huge variety of interesting flavors, and—surprise!—they all taste like amped-up versions of what's...

Cooking Fresh: A Fresh Look at Fish

A Fresh Look at Fish BY JESS THOMSON In case you didn't notice, things are changing here in Seattle. This winter, Pike Place Fish Market, home to the world-famous fish throwers, remodeled its storefront and its vision; it now sells only sustainable fish. Pair that with the release of Seattleite Becky Selengut's tribute to earth-friendly eating, a cookbook called Good Fish, and an increased awareness of sustainability issues, and you've got a city full of folks who want to eat fish differently. The problem? Well, we're not all that used to seeing a fish head-on. And while those pristine white filets look pretty all lined up on the ice, they're costly, and they deprive us of a few important things: the rich,...

Syncline Wine Cellars

From the beginning the Syncline wines have been compelling and stylistically unique for Washington. The Mantones have focused on lower alcohol, food-friendly wines where the fruit is front and center. James says the couple's personal preference for European wines has informed the winery's style....

Salad Days

Other people may look forward to the lilacs blooming each May, but one of my favorite signs of the season is the return to the farmers market of Let Us Farm and their tender heads of Bronze Arrow, Black Seeded Simpson, Red Bijou, and Gallice. Perhaps you have not heard these names before, but they may just be the best lettuces you will ever taste....

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Recipe Box

BY MYRA KOHN Recipe courtesy of Jerry Traunfeld, Poppy Restaurant I've been obsessed with this salad since the first time I had it at Poppy. They serve it with just baked, warm naan and it is impossible to resist. The nutty and starchy quality of the chickpeas combined with the aromatic, not too hot blend of spices and cooling yogurt, makes it not only a terrific and healthy snack or satisfying quick meatless lunch but also a side dish that pairs nicely with simply roasted lamb. We love it so much we have no problem eating it by the forkful. 2 (main dish) or 6 (side dish) servings | Start to finish: 20 minutes Recipe 2 cups cooked chickpeas 2 tablespoons peanut oil, or other vegetable...

Our AVAS – Horse Heaven Hills

If the Red Mountain AVA, subject of last issue's profile, is the rodeo rider down in the ring, the Horse Heaven Hills are the bleachers....

Editor’s Letter

The last few months have been especially busy for me, but the Edible Seattle Cookbook is now off to the publishers. Somehow, I've started thinking of publishers as the equivalent of a spa for Word documents: My mess of plain Times New Roman pages will return to me after several weeks of receiving the print version of mani-pedi/highlights/facial/massage. Freshly primped and shiny clean, the books will magically appear next January—well after I've caught up on sleep and forgotten the madness of trying to schedule a photo shoot on the other side of the state just as the year's deepest pile of snow was getting dumped all over the mountain passes. Now I get to turn my focus away from my laptop...