Recipe Box: Tutta Bella’s Bietola Marinata

BY MYRA KOHN Ah, the humble beet. It just doesn't get enough credit. Prepared with care, at the peak of freshness, it can be a revelation. This is one of those rare recipes that will turn beet avoiders into fiends. Just don't feel discouraged by the cooking times. The process, effortless for the most part, and the salad, finished with a sprinkle of toasted pistachios and mounds of creamy goat cheese as a garnish, is as delectable as it is appealing. You'll be craving it like candy! Bietola Marinata recipe courtesy Tutta Bella Neapolitan Pizzeria 8 servings| start to finish: 1 day from Edible Seattle November/December 2011 Recipe 5 lbs. beets (any will do, but a mix of red, golden and Chioggia if possible) 1/4 cup olive oil 2...

The Third Pomme- Quince

Whence the quince—so beautifully ripe, organic, and local to the Puget Sound region? It's from an island farm of odd fruits. Guemes Island, Idaho, Iran, and the Garden of Eden hold in common what is thought to have been the forbidden fruit in Paradise: not an apple, but rather the quince....

Get the Berries

BY BETH MAXEY The majority of cranberries are grown in bogs and harvested by flooding: the berries are agitated, float to the top, and are then collected from the surface. Cranberries collected by flooding are usually not uniformly ripe and are waterlogged, making them unsuitable for a fresh product. These berries are juiced for my aunt and other Cosmo lovers, dried into the popular Crasins (there's a big Craisin factory in Aberdeen), or jellied into my favorite childhood product. Many Northwest cranberry growers are part of the Ocean Spray cooperative, but a few farms are flying solo. From Oregon, Cape Blanco offers well ripened hand-picked berries at www.capeblancocranberries.com, and Stahlbush Island Farms sells their cranberries at Central Co-op's Madison Market. Bloom Creek Cranberries...

A Very Dainty Jelly

My grandma was a Depression era farm girl turned career woman, who went from home-canned veggies and burlap skivvies to high heels, high efficiency and a love of Betty Crocker instant cakes and Marie Callendar frozen pies....

A Life in Clay

We all start out making mud pies, relishing the sticky-cool squish between our little fingers. Long snakes of clay, coiled into primitive bowls on a kindergarten afternoon, are among our first gifts to parents....

A Cry for Help

BY BECKY SELENGUT "We're sorry. You have reached a number that is disconnected or that is no longer in service." Ah, holiday season: a time of year when I consider flushing my phone down the toilet to drown out the culinary hotline cries for help. I love to help, don't get me wrong—it's the time of giving, after all. The thing about the holidays, though, is that I can hear the panic in the caller's voice and the call almost always comes too late, long after the shit hit the fan. There was this one, a few years back: "So… I've never made a turkey before and they ran out of fresh so I bought a frozen one today but dinner's tonight and...

Charlie Bodony / Some Like it Hott

Charlie Bodony's spice business began as part experiment, part backyard hobby, and part homage to his Transylvanian heritage. Bodony grows the peppers for his blossoming company, Some Like It Hott, in his Port Townsend backyard. There, in two greenhouses behind the garage, is where the magic starts....

Cooking Fresh: (Not So) Cookie Cutter

BY JESS THOMPSON I'd be lying if I said holiday baking is about health. It's not. By definition, the cookies we dish out to neighbors each year are meant to fill us with joy and gratitude and calories; each sugary treasure is the physical embodiment of the word indulgence. We forget, though, that tinkering with Grandma's favories can go beyond using a different cookie cutter. Here, we've taken four holiday classics - shortbread, brittle, fudge, and Russian tea cakes - and updated them, Seattle style. They're a great way to incorporate healthier ingredients like emmer flour, millet, quinoa, and roasted hazelnuts into your baking repertoire, without losing the essence of the treat-giving tradition that makes this time of year so exciting. Note...

Sophisticated Nutrition

Jim Watkins seemed a perfect fit to head the dining program at Bastyr University. The dining commons, open to the public as well as to students and staff, had earned a reputation for solid, healthful vegetarian food....

The Domaine Ste. Michelle Flight

BY ASHLEY GARTLAND Winemaker Rick Casqueiro crafts five different styles of sparkling wines for Domaine Ste. Michelle from similar blends of various varietal wines each year. To help you choose the one that best suits your needs, we've provided tasting notes and pairing options for each of the wines. Blanc de Blancs Casqueiro selects five 100 percent chardonnay cuvées based on their aroma and acidity to create this balanced blend. Tasters appreciated the wine's crisp green apple notes and pairing potential for rich, creamy foods like Brie and chocolate desserts. Brut This medium-dry blend of 88 percent Chardonnay and 12 percent Pinot Noir grapes is the Baby Bear of the Domaine Ste. Michelle label. It's not too sweet or too dry—it's just right. The wine's...

Sparkling Wines from Domaine St. Michelle

The Burien pub is airy and inviting, and Elliott Bay's head brewer Doug Hindman's affable attitude suggests that the complex brewing system he manages brings him more joy than stress. "Craft brewers are generally a pretty agreeable lot," he says, and not surprisingly, I find myself agreeing with him....

A LEAN, SWEET MEAT

BY TARA AUSTEN WEAVER It doesn't taste gamey. Sue Muggy describes buffalo as being "a little sweeter and a little richer than beef," but there is none of the wild game flavor some people expect. "The first thing I ask a customer is how they like their steak," explains Muggy. "If they like it medium or well done, I'll sell them a less expensive cut like tri-tip or sirloin and tell them to marinate it." Because there's less fat, you need to add some moisture if you're going to cook it well. Those who prefer their meat rare should keep an eye on it. Less fat means buffalo cooks fast. "There's no insulation," says Muggy. "The first time you cook buffalo, you will...

Buffaloed

The awe-inspiring presence of an extraordinary beast BY TARA AUSTEN WEAVER PHOTOS BY LARA FERRONI "Can you see them?" John Muggy and I are standing at the perimeter of a fenced pasture on his farm just north of Bellingham, staring across the field at the woods on the other side. He's been rattling an empty plastic bottle with a handful of rocks inside and calling to them. Now, we are waiting for the buffalo. The first animal that appears out of the woods has the solid horns and pronounced shoulders, sloping down to a smaller rump. The silhouette is what I expected from films and images of the Wild West. What I didn't expect is the speed or agility the animal displays. "They can...

OUR AVAS- Lake Chelan

During the long summer days, Lake Chelan acts as a collector of heat, which it then radiates back into the vineyards. In winter, the phenomenon protects the vineyards from frost....

Urban Foraging: Four Books

BY JILL LIGHTNER When my family gives me books as Christmas gifts, I'm made to open them last—otherwise, I tend to ignore the remaining festivities and curl up with my new paper friends. I know I am not alone in this. Amidst the stacks of titles released at the end of the year, here are a few of my very favorites, with my suggestion of who might love them the most.   FOR THE NURTURER At the Kitchen Table A number of years ago, Greg Atkinson was one of the first people to ever communicate to me why buying local was important. In the years both before and after that conversation, he's done his best to communicate that idea—and a host of others—through cooking, teaching...

Editor’s Letter

BY JILL LIGHTNER One of you lovely people did a very nice thing with our last issue: you brought your copy to the University District Farmers Market and asked Taki to sign the article that Tara Austen Weaver wrote about him. Taki told Tara, and said "now I am famous." Since our launch, we've said that we want farmers to be as famous as rock stars, and these days it's starting to feel true—I see more cameras every week during market season, and my jokes about paparazzi chasing farmers around their fields doesn't feel that far off the mark. We love telling their stories, and we're eternally grateful for their willingness to talk to our writers. Behind these stories, there's always a lot...