Honeyed Panna Cottas

serves 6 | start to finish: 15 minutesfrom Edible Seattle November/December 2012Sweetened with honey and stabilized with a wisp of gelatin, this elegant dessert comes together in under 15 minutes. If you like, serve it with plenty of chopped fresh fruit and a drizzle of honey. An amber honey—typically made from fall pollens—will add deliciously spicy notes in this delicate dish. 1/4 cup cold water 2 teaspoons unflavored gelatin (from 1 envelope) 2 cups heavy cream 1 cup whole milk 1/2 cup honey Seeds from 1/2 vanilla bean, split Pour the water into a small heatproof bowl, and sprinkle the gelatin on top. Let the mixture stand until the gelatin thickens, so it looks like pale applesauce. Bring...

Asian Pears with Toasted Goat Cheese and Sweet Buttered Walnuts

serves 6 | start to finish: 20 minutesFrom Edible Seattle November/December 2012 Rockridge Orchards grows a seemingly infinite variety of Asian pears, with flavors ranging from lime to butterscotch. Broiled with goat cheese and topped with simple honey- and butter-candied walnuts, the pears get good and warm but still somehow manage to stay crisp. 2 tablespoons unsalted butter 2 tablespoons honey, plus more for drizzling 3 cups walnut halves 2 Asian pears, such as Hosui 4 ounces goat cheese, crumbled Preheat the oven to 400°F. Melt the butter over medium heat in a small, ovenproof pan. Add the honey, stirring until...

Time for Tinning

Slow Food Fourth Corner is hosting more tuna tinning events this year between Thanksgiving and Christmas for anyone who wants to make homemade gifts this holiday season. Host cities are Seattle, Bellingham and Port Townsend. For more information and to sign up for a spot, visit the Slow Food Fourth Corner Page at facebook.com/pages/Slow-Food-Fourth-Corner/100667066688230. ...

One Fish, Two Fish

tuna tinning lessons from the people who know best BY AMY PENNINGTON PHOTOS BY KELLY CLINE When I got an invitation for a work-trade wherein I would assist in canning Washington albacore tuna in exchange for a great price on...

All The Cider, None of the Work

While not everyone gets to live at Finnriver for a month, it's easy to find their ciders. Tasting Room: 62 Barn Swallow Road, Chimacum October 1-April 30: Friday-Sunday from noon-5pm May 1-September 30: Thursday-Monday from noon-5pm ...

Chicken Friends and Mummy Berries

how a city boy reacts to a month of rural life STORY AND PHOTOS BY JAMESON FINK "You're going to live on a farm?!? YOU?!?" This was my family's incredulous reaction when we gathered at Christmastime...

Finding Your Ideal Ranch

Washington has a substantial number of family farms raising meat for purchase in bulk quantities. You can find beef, pork, lamb and goat; some are certified organic while others use Animal Welfare Approved or Salmon Safe label certifications. There's also a huge range of breeds available—like Scottish Highland beef (Lostine Cattle Company, Teas Ranch), Berkshire hogs (Rocky Ridge Ranch) and Boer goats (Toboton Creek). ...

Meet the Meat

the accidental beginnings of a meat buying club BY JILL LIGHTNER PHOTO BY LANNE STAUFFER I have clear memories of particular shopping trips from my...

Drying Persimmons

An American cookbook from 1915 offers the following no-nonsense recipe: "Spread a layer of ripe persimmon pulp"—in this case, a ripe astringent variety, like hachiya—"on waxed paper…and dry in the sun or in an open oven. Remove the seeds. Add another layer of pulp, and repeat until the leather is of a thickness to handle easily." This basic technique translates well to modern dehydrators. ...

Ripening

There are many varieties of persimmon—more than 175—but the varieties you are most likely to find growing in your neighbor's yard or at your farmers market are the round, tomato-like fuyu and the bright orange teardrop, hachiya. I think it is useful to think of these two types of persimmons as separate fruits. ...

Under the Persimmon Tree

the history and culture behind winter's prettiest fruit BY BETH MAXEY PHOTOS BY KELLY CLINE In the winter, in Seattle, when most fruit is long off the trees, persimmons still dot the city with color. Especially in old Japantown just north of Jackson Street, and near Jefferson Park on the top of Beacon Hill, but throughout the city really, these orange fruit hang on high leafless branches, like out-of-reach Christmas ornaments. Who planted them? Why aren't they being eaten? I'd eaten persimmons before and knew they could be delicious. I also knew they could be incredibly tart. Which were these? I would stare at them and wonder. In 1853, US Navy Commodore Matthew Perry famously steamed his fleet of black frigates...

A Chef and Her Dog

BY BECKY SELENGUT My dog has bulimia. Well, not bulimia exactly, because that would imply she's capable of having a body image. Such human concerns would divert mental energy from her signature move: the canine scarf and barf. ...

Binge: Granola

Some like nuts. Some like chunks. Some like it loose, with chewy bits of fruit. No matter how you take your granola, there's one for you made in Seattle. We tasted upwards of 20 combinations—who knew...

Cooking Fresh: Dishing Up Washington

Jess Thomson has developed fantastic recipes for us in every issue since our first—back in spring of 2008. This issue, we give her something of a break to sing the praises of her new book, Dishing Up Washington. Yes, it's a showcase of our region's remarkable ingredients, and yes, it's gorgeous thanks to Lara Ferroni's beautiful photography, but it's Jess's palate and attention to detail that make this book such a stand out. Jess's recipes consistently work the way they're supposed to, and they're delicious. She knows when to be decadent (hello, holiday season) and how to make...

On The Marc in Walla Walla

"No way!" I replied, rather ungraciously, when Kyle Mussman, owner of the Marcus Whitman hotel in Walla Walla and its lovely restaurant The Marc, made me an outrageous offer. "A seven course no-carb Chef's Table tasting menu on a Saturday night? The chef's going to kill you!"...

The Language of Farming

Seattle Tilth's Farm Incubator BY TARA AUSTEN WEAVER As dawn breaks over fields on a hillside in Auburn one August morning, crops are being harvested. Kale, chard, and zucchini, gathered by farmers from the plots they tend, are washed, packed, and sent to market—but these are no ordinary farmers.  They are participants in a unique...

Where to Try Northwest Wine Academy’s Wines

Retail shops: NWWA's tasting room is located at 6000 16th Ave SW, in Seattle. It's open during regular school hours and for occasional special events. Call (206) 764-5300 to confirm the day's hours before you go.  Also check Metropolitan Market in Queen Anne, Esquin Wines in Sodo, and Vino Verité on Capitol Hill. Restaurants: Check the wine lists at Skelly and...

OUR AVAs- Columbia Gorge

Columbia Gorge: scratching the surface BY RONALD HOLDEN For sheer size, the Columbia ranks fourth among North America's great rivers, behind the Mississippi, the Saint Lawrence, and the Mackenzie. It drains a basin that extends from the Rockies to the Pacific Ocean; it has twice the flow of the Nile, ten times as much as the Colorado. Some 150 miles from the sea, it courses through the Columbia Gorge,...

Urban Foraging: Mirepoix Caramels

This is one of the best food-themed gifts we've ever come across. First of all, it's a benefit project for Farestart's culinary job training program. Second, the confections combine organic, Fair Trade chocolate with fundamental cooking ingredients that are delightfully odd to encounter in candies: the basic aromatics of mirepoix. Inside the box are four caramels—one each of celery herb, bay fennel, carrot coriander and caramelized onion. All are surprising, and sized generously enough that each can be sliced in half and shared. As it turns out, celery is delicious in caramels…and caramelized onions are delicious...

Urban Foraging: Books

November has become an annual cookbook deluge, which is both wonderful and overwhelming—how can you choose from among so many interesting titles from our local authors? ...

Editor’s Letter

It's odd to move straight from the election year frenzy to holiday celebrations, but in some ways it's a good thing: maybe a lovely shared meal can help soothe the furiously diverse opinions that have been getting shouted about in blogs and on facebook for the last few months. Repeatedly in this issue, I'm reminded of the remarkable accomplishments that can happen when very different people work together for a specific goal. Tara...