apple walnut salad cider cinnamon vinaigrette

Cider-Cinnamon Vinaigrette

Makes 1 1/2 cups Start to finish: 5 minutes from Edible Seattle September/October 2010 Use this brew, the lightest of vinaigrettes, to coat a simple mixed green salad tossed with thinly-sliced apples and chopped nuts. Recipe 1 shallot, chopped 2 teaspoons Dijon mustard Salt and freshly ground pepper (to taste) 1/2 cup apple cider vinegar 1/4 cup apple cider 1/2 teaspoon ground cinnamon 1/2 cup canola oil Steps Whirl all ingredients except the oil in a blender or food processor until smooth. With the machine running, add the oil, and bend until uniform. Store up to 1 week in a sealed jar; shake before using. *Vegetarian *Vegan *Dairy-Free *15 minutes or less *Gluten-Free...

Places for Picnics

BY KERRI HARTMAN If you can make it through the market without eating all of your purchases, there are two perfect picnic places, each within a half-mile. Head East on Lawrence Street, walk five blocks to Monroe Street, and make your decision. To go with either spot, I suggest an epi from Pan D'Amore bakery. They're easy to tear into little sandwiches. Add Sea Stack from Mt Townsend Creamery, and a handful peppery arugula from Midori farm and you've got a sandwich. Finish with a pint of berries from Finnriver. Boats and Beach For all things nautical, turn right and walk four blocks down to the Northwest Maritime Center. Visitors can watch craftsman working on wooden boats, or take advantage of the views from the pilot's...

port townsend farmers market

Small Town, Big Market-Port Townsend

Port Townsend is known for many things: historic buildings, wooden boats, walkability and the sort of scenery that makes people move here from other, likely warmer, regions. But day trips aren't any fun if the food isn't good, and that might explain the town's recent notoriety. It's delicious....

GRANOLA

Great Granola

Patience and a wooden spoon are the only required ingredients BY ASHLEY GARTLAND A few years ago, my husband Jake discovered a granola he couldn't live without—and truth be told, neither could I. When Jake wasn't home, I caught myself snitching "tastes" of his store bought granola two, three, sometimes six times a day. Not surprisingly, he wasn't amused when he peeked into the pantry and found only meager clusters left to fill his cereal bowl. The solution, I suggested jokingly, was to make a sign that marked the granola as his alone. So he did, complete with a granola cluster characterization and talk bubble that read "Don't Eat Me!" That sign was the end of my snitching, and the start of something...

sept10_newport hills william belickis class

21st Century Home Ec

Culinary programs provide teens with more than basic skills BY AMY PENNINGTON PHOTOS BY LARA FERRONI As a child, I never really thought about what I wanted to be when I grew up. To be honest, the topic was seldom raised in my house. My parents were strictly blue collar, and it never occurred to me that I would be anything else. Eventually, I fell into the restaurant industry and I ended up falling hard. I had never realized that someone could actually make a living cooking food, or writing about food. The idea was so foreign to me, that I lived in near-constant awe my first few years working with a professional chef. I look back on that time as one of...

Home Grown

Don't let those "apple maggot quarantine area" signs dissuade you from planting a backyard tree. "Footie" nylon stockings can be wrapped around fruits for protection, and baited sticky traps are a reliable method to minimize damage. Make sure to pick up any fallen fruit and toss it into the city yard waste bins, where they'll get well cooked before becoming compost. Trees for the Novice Grower These trees have proven themselves with reliable harvests and high disease resistance. Chehalis Elstar Jonagold Liberty Trees for the Home Cider Maker Sometimes considered too acidic for fresh eating, these tart or bittersweet apples are ideal for home-pressed juice or hard cider experiments. Bramley's Seedling Calville Blanc D'Hiver Dabinett > Golden Russet...

Storing Apples

Fruit is still a living organism after its harvest, and proper storage will keep it healthy and changing for anywhere from a few weeks to six months, depending on the variety and storage conditions. Even in houses not equipped with root cellars, finding a good storage spot is simple. Many popular local varieties that store well are mentioned here, but if you have a favorite variety that isn't mentioned, just ask your farmer how well they keep—they'll know better than anyone else. Apples should ideally be kept between 30 and 40 degrees. Unheated garages, covered patios or sheds around Puget Sound are usually ideal, with a thick sheet of Styrofoam between your storage box and the floor for our brief...

Use It or Lose It

BY ABRA BENNETT A fish is made of the water in which it swims, just as a carrot is made of the soil in which it grows. We seldom think about the volume of water being used by fish in the oceans, lakes, and streams—instead, we worry about pollutant load, obstruction of the waterways by dams, warming of lakes and streams, and other such environmental factors. But when it comes to aquaculture, we can't help but be concerned about how our precious water resources are being employed to grow a fish. In Washington, certain fundamental principles enshrined in law govern how water is shared. The most important one is the notion that water belongs to the public. Then, allocation of the rights...

closed loop salmon farm

How Sweet It Is

'Supergreen' salmon, straight from the farm BY ABRA BENNETT PHOTOS BY SHEL HALL Picture a Norwegian island 200 miles north of the Arctic Circle, Andøya. Humans lived there in the Stone Age, peat bogs and whales dot the scenery. Fish dominate the region's economy: fishing for cod, and salmon farming. This is where Per Heggelund grew up. Today, Heggelund owns the AquaSeed Corporation in Rochester, southeast of Olympia. It's the state's only closed-containment salmon farm, and it's home to the SweetSpring brand of Coho salmon. You might be ready to turn the page, thinking you'd never eat a farmed salmon. You might think farmed salmon are the scourge of the fish counter, the ruination of the ecosystem. You wouldn't be alone in thinking that, but...

artisan apple cider

Binge: Hard Apple Cider

BY JILL LIGHTNER Eaglemount Ginger Cider tastes halfway between ginger ale and hard cider. It inspired a boozy version of an east coast childhood treat: combine two scoops of vanilla ice cream with this cider and call it a Port Townsend Cooler. Port Townsend, 8% alcohol; $15. Finnriver Farmstead Sparkling Cider Methode Ancestrale is a glass full of celebration. Crisp and quite fizzy, this cider's great for raising a toast, and goes down all too easily on warm afternoons. Chimacum, 8.6% alcohol; $15. Red Barn Fire Barrel is aged in bourbon barrels, and has a distinct smoky finish. Nice after-dinner drink for bourbon fans. Mount Vernon, 8% alcohol; $12. Sweetie Pie has a complex apple flavor thanks to a big presence of the mighty Gravenstein. A...

Cooking Fresh: How ‘bout them apples?

By Jess Thomson Belle de Boskoop. Stayman Winesap. Roxbury Russet. If the orbs flooding your farmers markets sound like romance novel characters, don't be too surprised—we get a little romantic about our heirloom apples around here. This time of year, you'll find flavors that blow your average Granny Smith to smitherines: Bite into a Golden Russet for a hit of ginger, or a Spitzenburg for a bit of spice. Bake Cox Orange Pippins and Bramley's Seedlings into pies. Or find your new favorite, and incorporate it into one of our recipes—crab cakes with a quick pickled fennel and apple slaw, golden pork roast stuffed with fruit, or rich crème brulée lined with applesauce made by poaching the forbidden fruit in maple...

appel farms

Cheese Planet

Ferndale's farmstead creamery sources recipes from around the world BY TIM NEWCOMB PHOTO BY CAROLE TOPALIAN "I make cheese here nobody has ever heard of," says John Appel about his quirky combination of quark, Gouda and paneer. "I make what the big guys aren't interested in." Appel Farms, a Ferndale-based farmstead operation, is one of the oldest artisan cheesemakers in the state and they have remained relevant by creating cheese that they can market locally, regionally and nationally. "People are looking for something special," John says. "They don't want just orange cheddar 60 days old." For John, who runs the cheesemaking, and brother Rich, who oversees the 250-head herd that produces all the milk for the cheese, it all started with their dad, Jack. When he...

zephyr paquette

The Bomb

Putting Up with Zephyr Paquette BY BETHANY JEAN CLEMENT PHOTO BY KELLY O THE SUBJECT: Even in the context of the changeable lives that chefs lead, Zephyr Paquette has done a lot. She was the brunch chef at Seattle vegetarian institution Café Flora for almost three years. Then just as reality TV was making it big, she was on the reality show Making It Big on the Oxygen Network. "It was pretty dumb," she says, succinctly. She cooked at Dandelion, the marvelous little Ballard bistro that closed when owner Carol Nockold became ill with, and eventually succumbed to, Lou Gehrig's disease. She helped start Eat Local, the local organic frozen-meal operation. She worked for Delicious Planet, the organic-meal delivery service. Then Zephyr took a...

Local Authors

BY KIM RICKETTS Autumn is the richest book season, and our local crop of writers has done us proud. Chef Ethan Stowell has been uncommonly busy of late: opening a new restaurant soon (Staple & Fancy Mercantile in Ballard) and publishing his first cookbook. Ethan Stowell's New Italian Kitchen (co-authored by Leslie Miller) features Italian food done in his sophisticated but approachable style, with recipes like gnocchi with morels and fried duck egg or cardamom sablés. Each chapter begins with an essay from Ethan and captures his irreverent wit: the dessert chapter is titled "Cheese for the Civilized, and Desserts for the Rest of You". It is a book of bold cooking from one of our most celebrated chefs. Shauna Ahern told...

Editor’s Letter

BY JILL LIGHTNER My summer involved a particular new thrill: I picked enough home-grown sour cherries to make two pints of jam. Making that jam was the last step in an eight month process, which started with researching cherry trees (I went with a Surefire from Raintree Nursery). It proceeded with digging a positively enormous hole in what felt like solid clay, staring at the tree anxiously through the winter and chilly spring, staring at it even more anxiously once it bloomed (what if it gets cold again?), moping about for those long last weeks of our dismally gray early summer, convinced that nothing could ripen under such circumstances, and heading from there straight to full-alert bird defense (silver Mylar tape...