Apple Pie Filling/Caramel Vanilla Seckel Pears

BY AMY PENNINGTON Apples are available all year long, but they are certainly not in season all year long. New crop apples, those that are harvested and sold in the same season, are the best tasting—their juice just contained under firm, naturally shiny skins. Ditto for pears, which are best eaten soon after harvesting. To preserve the natural, raw integrity of fresh fruit, buy both in bulk when they come into the markets. Boxes of apples are infinitely less expensive than buying a pound at a time, so choose a favorite variety (most farmers offer samples) and load up. As for the little pears, keep your eyes open and buy the lot when you have a chance. ***Apple Pie Filling makes about...

Wine Recommendations

***Leonetti Cellar Sangiovese Walla Walla Valley 2010 $65 A consistent benchmark for Washington Sangiovese, this wine—which includes 11% Syrah—is tightly wound with tart cherry flavors, cranberry-like acidity and firm tannins. ***Long Shadows Vintners Saggi Red Wine Columbia Valley 2009 $45 Crafted by Tuscany's Ambrogio and Giovanni Folonari and shepherded by resident winemaker Gilles Nicault, this Super Tuscan-style blend of Sangiovese (62%), Cabernet Sauvignon (29%) and Syrah (9%) has soft, supple...

Rainy-Side Wheat

the terroir of Western Washington's grains STORY AND PHOTOS BY TARA AUSTEN WEAVER You might not expect a plant geneticist to be an avid bread baker, but Dr. Stephen Jones of Washington State University is one. "I learned to bake from my Polish grandmother," he explains. "We made rye every weekend." Jones' great uncle ran a bakery in Newark New Jersey, so bread is very much in his blood. Perhaps this influenced his choice of wheat as...

Tastes Like Chicken

moving beyond the CornishX BY ABRA BENNETT PHOTOS BY SHEL HALL Mmmm, tastes like chicken. Or does it? Do any of us remember what chicken is supposed to taste like, in this era of Frankenfoods? Even Christopher Columbus is reported to have been easily confused, when he ate a serpent and reported in his captain's log that, "the meat is white and tastes like chicken." Today chicken is often bland and boring, with the near-ubiquitous boneless, skinless breast, darling of dieters, being the worst case example. But perhaps it was not always thus. Chickens have been domesticated for at least 7,000 years, and our ancestors would scarcely have put up with their pecking and crowing if the inevitable result...

A Concise Chicktionary

***Capon A rooster that has been castrated to improve the quality of its flesh for food. ***Chicken Typically refers to either sex of gallus gallus domesticus, the world’s most common species of bird. ***Cock A mature, male chicken. ***Cockerel Common UK term for a young male chicken, less than one year old. ***Rooster Common North American and Australian word for mature, male chicken. ***Hen A female chicken of any age. ***Layer A hen kept for laying eggs. ***Pullet...

Taking Stock

a look at the life of a laying hen STORY AND PHOTOS BY BETH MAXEY A few years ago my husband walked up to Dog Mountain Farm's booth at the Broadway Farmers Market. The table was covered with dozens of fresh eggs. My husband leaned in and whispered to David, the owner. "I'm here to support the chicken retirement program." David winked. "Certainly." He turned to his cooler and handed us a compact frozen bird. "That'll be two...

Cleaning Really Dirty Chanterelles

(because you don't need to clean clean-ish ones) Most purists will tell you to always use a damp paper towel or brush to clean mushrooms, and to never (!) let them come in contact with water. I reserve the plunge-and-slosh technique for chanterelles that are filthy: the ones covered in pine needles and mud are most likely already a little saturated with water from a rainy fall day. 1. Fill a large bowl of water with cool water. Lay out a large, absorbent dish towel on a sheet pan or on your counter.2. Plunge a handful of chanterelles into the water (not too many) and slosh them around with your fingertips loosening the dirt and pine needles. Be quick about...

The Girl Next Door

[caption id="" align="alignright" width="475"] playful chanterelles are the region's friendliest fungus[/caption] BY BECKY SELENGUT PHOTOS BY KELLY CLINE It was overcast and threatening to rain, not to mention that the light was fading so we didn't have much time to check out the spot. I'm fast on my friend Amy's heels, and we're scanning for chanterelles, chatting and bush-whacking all at the same time, a little too much multi-tasking for this inexperienced mushroomer. To wit: not even five feet into the woods I get poked in the eye with a Douglas fir branch. This slows Amy down just long enough to make sure my cornea is still intact. She's on a mission and a branch in the eye isn't going to come between...

cutest puppy

Liver Cannoli and Other Good Things

BY BECKY SELENGUT You might remember Bubba (Back of the House Nov/Dec ’12). She was my regal queen of a Labrador with an eating disorder which several times threatened to cut her life short. After each incident (eating 30 pounds of kibble in one sitting, toxic grapes another, the infamous bag of flour) she would recover to eat another day. I shared my life with her for 15 1/2 years until we had to make the agonizing decision to euthanize her this past fall. We’re not sure if we turned her light off forever or ushered her into a heaven lined with all the garbage cans she could get her paws on, but either way, she will never be forgotten. I think...

Changing Your Perception

  Korean goes upscale at Pike Place Market BY MEGAN HILL PHOTOS BY HILARY MCMULLEN The stylish décor and just-so plating means this is a nice restaurant: I should sit up straight and put my napkin on my lap, but all I really want to do is lick my plate. I use every ounce of self-restraint to keep from embarrassing myself during my meal at Chan, the Korean fusion restaurant in the courtyard of the Inn at the Market. My tiny table is crammed with sweet-spicy bulgogi beef sliders; piles of tangy kimchis made from cucumber, daikon, and cabbage;...

Cooking Fresh: Vegetarian Feast

By Jess ThomsonFor all the pre-pubescent pain the transition from spring to summer causes, we're rewarded with the sunny, sweet flip from summer to fall. Fruit and vegetables plump on their branches, and in the kitchen, when nights get cold, we start churning out comfort food. This month, start by stuffing roasted sweet potatoes with fresh tomatoes, zucchini, eggplant, peppers, goat cheese, and basil, for a full-belly vegetarian meal that's easy to make a day or two ahead. Serve the potatoes with millet "polenta," heady with lemon and mint, and finish the meal with a savory beet sorbet drizzled with olive oil and garnished with flaky sea salt. As usual, the second dinner recipe relies on leftovers from the first;...

Cooking Fresh: Vegetarian Feast

four generations of hard work at Tonnemaker Hill Farm BY TARA AUSTEN WEAVER PHOTOS BY TARA AUSTEN WEAVER AND JILL LIGHTNER In the late '60s, when Orland Tonnemaker bought a plot of land near Royal City and planned to plant a cherry orchard, everyone told him it was a bad idea. The north side of Frenchman Hills, near Moses Lake, was too cold, they said, but Orland was determined. Along with his family— wife Pearl, son Gene and his wife Joyce, and their two small children—he began to clear the sagebrush hills. "Our first job was picking up rocks," says Orland's grandson Kole Tonnemaker, "I was three years old." The rocks needed to be removed to prepare the soil for the trees...

Sangiovese

finding a happy home for the 'blood of Jove'  BY SEAN P. SULLIVAN It is said that wine is the 'nectar of the gods.' If so, no wine could be closer in name and spirit to the heavens than Sangiovese, a grape whose name derives from the Latin sanguis Jovis—the blood of Jove, king of the gods. Sangiovese is unquestionably one of the world's great wine grape varieties. It is the most planted variety in Italy, the grape's homeland,...

Labels

BY JILL LIGHTNER These days it's difficult to take a stand on anything at all without coming across as strident. Whether it's facebook friends or the U.S. Senate, our society seems dedicated to the concept of polarization, and along with polarization comes misinformation. Once i-522 had collected enough signatures to become an official ballot measure for this November's elections, I spent some time in conversation with a variety of people to hear their thoughts on this initiative. Consumers' major concern is that food prices will go up; this is certainly the message behind the antilabeling campaign. Yet here's a supporter—the founder and president of Nature's Path on the topic: "We, as with most manufacturers, are continually updating our packaging. It is a...