Cold Pack Dilly Beans

Cold Pack Refrigerator Dilly BeansMakes: 1 quart jar This recipe makes a single jar of not-too-spicy pickled beans, but it can easily be adjusted to make multiple quarts. With this cold pack method, sealed jars should be stored in the refrigerator. Beans cure quickly, and will be ready for eating just two days after the pickling process--but they'll store for up to six months in the fridge. Pack into one sterilized wide-mouth quart jar: 2 cups blanched green beans, trimmed in length to fit completely in the jar without sticking out the top 1/2 white onion, sliced thin 2 sprigs fresh dill 1/2 teaspoon whole black peppercorns 1/4 teaspoon red pepper flakes For the brine: 3/4 cup white vinegar 3/4 cup water...

Garlic Dill Pickles

Puyallup's Duris Cucumber Farm included this recipe in a booklet they published in the early 1960s. The recipe credits Marilyn Roberts, who said it was from an (unnamed) 1886 cookbook. As the jars age, the heat from the dried pepper increases substantially, so plan the amount of pepper used according to taste. These pickles are far crisper than any mass-produced version, and well worth the effort of careful canning. makes: 10 quart jars | start to finish: about 2 hours, plus a couple months curing time For the jars: Sterilize 10 wide-mouth quart jars. To each jar, add these ingredients in the order given: 1 teaspoon pickling spice 1 clove garlic 1 onion slice, approximately 1/4" thick 1 sprig of dill...

Dijon Dill Kebabs

by Jess Thomson Serves 6 | Prep Time: 30 minutes Instead of alternating meat or fish with vegetables the way many do with kebabs, I prefer to load each skewer with a single ingredient, so that I can give each vegetable the proper cooking time. This way, zucchini get cooked just to the height of their flavor, and not a minute longer, and the meat doesn't dry out.If you use wooden skewers, soak them in a pan of water for about 30 minutes before using, to avoid burning them over the fire. 4 chicken breasts, cut into 1" cubes (you could substitute 2 1/2 pounds salmon, halibut, or shrimp)3 small zucchini, cut into 1" rounds6 small roma tomatoes, halved1 bell pepper (any...

Muscat Love

MUSCAT LOVEby Ashley Gartland photo by Jill Lightner From the first warm days of June to the long, lazy September evenings, Seattle residents crave crisp, refreshing wines for summer sipping. T hink Sauvignon Blanc. Pinot Grigio. Riesling. Rosé. And Muscat. A sweet, low alcohol wine that hails from the oldest cultivated wine grape variety, it's long been enjoyed as a palate pleaser for summer days. This crisp, slightly sweet varietal charms with the fresh fruit notes of the grape, and – like many of its summer sister wines – offers a refreshing, aromatic thirst quencher. It's also ideal for enjoying as a pre-dinner wine or when served alongside spicy foods, a cheese course, shellfish or beside fresh summer fruit. But Muscat wines aren't...

Cucumber Paradise

CUCUMBER PARADISEby Heidi Broadheadphoto by Carole Topalian Sondra Andrews admits that walking into the Duris Cucumber Farm stand in Puyallup is like stepping into the past, and she wants to keep it that way. There are wood chips on the ground. A sign in the front says "Kindness Spoken Here." They play music by Perry Como and Doris Day. They even have flowers next to the Sani-Can around back. "I've resisted looking like a supermarket," Andrews says. "I want to keep this farm-stand atmosphere and not get too high-tech or too modern. And people like that. People like to go to a place that makes them feel good." The stand sells all kinds of produce from the Duris farm—strawberries, zucchini, yellow squash, fresh...

What It Takes to Make Cheese

     WHAT IT TAKES TO MAKE CHEESEby Ashley Gartlandphotos by Lara Ferroni "More and more people are coming out here to get those cheeses and really see where their food is coming from," says Samish Bay Cheese owner, Roger Wechsler. Roger and his wife Suzanne have been running their 150-acre farm and dairy in rural Western Washington since 1999. Their phenomenal cheeses range from creamy aged Gouda to cheddar-style Mont Blanchard to the full flavored, hard Montasio. Each cheese's rich flavor is a selling point but equally so is the fact that they are all certified organic, farmstead cheeses. Visitors to the farm will quickly and intimately understand what the "farmstead" label on the company's cheeses means. Farmstead cheeses are made right on...

Bada Bing

BADA BINGby Lara Ferroniphoto courtesy NW Cherries The cherries in my mother's cherry pie came from cans. These cherries had long forgotten their lives on the tree, and likely spent far more time sitting in their tins than in the fresh air, but I certainly didn't know any better at the time. My mother always went for tart, grayish cherries canned in their own juices, not the glossy neon red version packed in so much jelly-like syrup. Imagine my delight that first summer I planted myself in the Pacific Northwest and found a mature cherry tree planted in my backyard. Perched precariously on a branch, I'd pick all the little red fruits I could reach, leaving only the very top of the...

Mountain of Meat

MOUNTAIN OF MEATby Anna Rothphoto by Lara Ferroni It looks like any other home on a quiet Maple Leaf street. Little do neighbors know that a beast lurks in the backyard: a massive brick beast of a barbecue that Argentine expats Roberto and Marisa Altschul built in order to replicate the asados of their youth in Buenos Aires (asado refers to both the meat and the event; asador is the grillmaster). A handful of times a summer they fire it up, invite 30 of their closest friends and feast the afternoon away. Desperate to escape the dangerous military dictatorship in their country—"We lost a lot of friends," Marisa says—the Altschuls moved to Seattle when newly minted Ph.D. Roberto was offered a job...

Falling into Your Bucket

FALLING INTO YOUR BUCKETby Jill Lightner photo courtesy of Dan Barney Foraging for food is often written about in the context of the hunt. In this context, one must go to a tremendous amount of trouble to procure wild food, whether it's the secret mushroom patch accessible only by a 10-mile hike through biting flies or the freshwater fishing trip that depends on expensive equipment, complicated permits, good weather and a tremendous amount of pure, unreliable luck. Some people enjoy what they've gathered, caught or otherwise unearthed all the more after such effort and/or discomfort. For most of us, being damp, crabby and covered with bug bites does nothing to boost appreciation of anything at all. A little work is rewarding, but...

Because Farming Shouldn’t Be Boring

BECAUSE FARMING SHOULDN'T BE BORINGWade Bennett of Rockridge Orchardsby Eric Chastainphotos by Lara Ferroni I once had a girlfriend whose family loved their local flea market, or as they called it, the "swap meet." We would pile in the station wagon on a Saturday morning and stroll the dusty aisles to examine the treasures, the junk and the interesting people. Sometimes it was tough to tell the three apart. Being young and nearly broke, I was cautious with what money I had. So I ignored the used bikes and reconditioned guns, and usually headed for the snacks. Swap meet food ran to homemade jerky, fried dough and boiled corn. As I wander among the tables at the University District Farmers' Market on...

Summer Grilling Menu

SUMMER GRILLING MENUby Jess Thomsonphoto by Carole Topalian You've waited months for summer to get good and juicy on the vine. When it hits your dinner plate, ripe and heavy, you'll know better than to add anything, because most of summer tastes best plain. At first, you'll comply, adorning fat tomato slices with a sprinkle of sea salt, if anything, or gulping warm nectarines out of hand while the juice runs down your elbow. When you're done leaving well enough alone, come to these recipes, where summer's best blushes in a menu that keeps the grillmaster happy. From moist Dijon-dill kebabs—we thread each ingredient on its own skewer, so zucchini stay tender and onions have time to soften and sweeten—to grilled, honey-kissed...

Goldfish and Gruner Veltliner

Goldfish and Gruner Veltliner by Bethany Jean Clement photo by Lara Ferroni In which Edible Seattle visits the home of a prominent Pacific Northwest chef and reports on the contents of their refrigerator(s), snacks served, bowling balls and other miscellany. THE SUBJECT: Ethan Stowell, the chef/kingpin behind Seattle's esteemed restaurant trio Union, Tavolàta and How to Cook a Wolf. Stowell's just been named one of Food & Wine's Best New Chefs of 2008, and he's a finalist for a James Beard Foundation Award in the category of Best Chef: Northwest.  "I don't know what all it means, but we'll see," he says of receiving some of the restaurant industry's highest honors. For one of America's culinary meteors, he's a down-to-earth guy. He and his...

Madeleine Angevine

Grapes have been grown in the Puget Sound area since 1872, when Lambert Evans planted some on Stretch Island—but they were labrusca, or table grapes....

Knowing What It Means to Nurture

KNOWING WHAT IT MEANS TO NURTUREstory and photo by Pat Tanumiharadja On a sunny spring afternoon, I find Ericka Burke and Heather Earnhardt behind the counter of their very popular Capitol Hill café. The chef-owners are huddled over a panini grill deep in a heated discussion with a team of repairmen. Sandwiches are a staple on the café's daytime menu so their furrowed brows rightly demonstrate their concern. < All around them it's business as usual at Volunteer Park Café and Marketplace, a light-flooded yellow brick building wedged into the corner of 17th and Galer. Staff take orders for salads (there are five deliciously fresh combinations to choose from), Burke's seasonal pot pie (today's was chicken), or espresso drinks plus any one...

More Waiting

MORE WAITING Lummi Island Wild Preserves Excellence in Wild Salmon by Jenni Pertuset photos by Rod del Pozo Off Lummi Island at the northeast edge of the San Juan archipelago, half a dozen small boats lie at anchor in a row across Legoe Bay. On board, eight chefs wait for their next meal. Any moment now, a school of salmon will swim through artificial reefs leading to nets strung between paired boats, where the chefs must scoop the fish from the water before the school flashes over the waiting mesh. Men have fished these waters in this way for thousands of years. Until a few decades ago, the boats were dugout cedar canoes manned by the Lummi, Samish, Songhees, Semiahmoo, and other...

The Giving Gardener

THE GIVING GARDENER Sue McGann of Marra Farm by Amy Pennington photos by Carole Topalian and Lettuce Link The Giving Garden, located on Marra Organic Farm exists solely as a means to provide fresh and healthful produce to the South Park community and is run by Lettuce Link, a program of Solid Ground. Lettuce Link was created to distribute organic produce, seeds and plant starts to low-income families in Seattle. Each year the Giving Garden, as part of this program, puts up about 6.5 tons of food, all of which is designated to local food banks and the children who help on the farm. The person responsible for all of this? Sue McGann. "I'm a gardener" she says simply when I met...

Think Like A Plant

THINK LIKE A PLANT Seattle Tilth's Certified Organic Gardening Class by Amy Pennington photo by Lara Ferroni Give a girl a carrot, and she eats for a day. Teach a girl to garden and you feed her for a lifetime. That is how the saying goes, right? I want to grow my own carrots. And lettuce. And leeks. And herbs. Fresh, off-the-vine, just-picked food tastes a million times better than a tomato ripened under some hoop house in Canada in the dead of winter. Farmers' markets are hot for good reason, and it's no wonder that one day I started thinking to myself 'Hey, I can do this.' And do it, I did. Four years ago I started a small vegetable garden...

Learning to Eat Bread

LEARNING TO EAT BREADby Sean Hughesphotos by Carole Topalian Walking into Columbia City Bakery is like walking into a brighter world. There are ten flower-adorned tables arranged around the room, and most of them are usually occupied. Work from local artists decorates the walls and gives the bakery a warm, comfortable feel. Except nobody ever notices any of this when they first walk in, because straight ahead lie the display cases. Crusty, artisan bread of all shapes and sizes is heaped high behind a little glass partition, basket upon basket of pastries and cookies tempt on the left, while shelves of cakes entice on the right. When the visitor recovers enough to look up from the bostoks and doughnut muffins, the bakery...

Summer 2008

Summer has a way of convincing me that gluttony is a good thing. Berries for breakfast. A gigantic pile of carrots and haricots verts for lunch. A tomato salad, grilled corn and zucchini for dinner. It's a lot of food, but it's energizing and healthy in a happily unintentional way. None of these meals are chosen for being good for me: I'm just eating what tastes good, and there's no such thing as too much. It occurred to me a few years ago that home canning would let me feel like a virtuous glutton year round. I don't worry too much about getting the very first of everything as the season progresses, because I know that once a particular food shows...