Churning the Seasons

Friends have invited me to a potluck for tomorrow. Around the dinner table will be great cooks and other farmers, each fully capable of making a tasty dish....

Spicy Cranberry Gingerbread

Cookbook author Melissa Clark originated the cranberry gingerbread recipe, which she calls, “rude, sticky, and wet.” This is our version, with even more ginger for spice. It makes an excellent holiday gift for friends and family....

Starvation Alley Farms

farmer livelihood and the state’s first certified organic cranberries...

Fresh Pure Organic

in her Ballard ice cream shop, Adria Shimada sets the bar high...

Nov/Dec 2014 Letter from the Editor

Cookbook author Melissa Clark originated the cranberry gingerbread recipe, which she calls, “rude, sticky, and wet.” This is our version, with even more ginger for spice. It makes an excellent holiday gift for friends and family....

Wild Abandon

Perhaps you’ve admired a perfect head of lettuce in your garden or a friend’s—the spray of burgundy speckles across the rounded whorls of soft green leaves. But have you seen it six months later?...

Backyard Birds

How raising turkeys changed Thanksgiving...

Going All In

How many of us have gazed out an office window and wondered whether we should be following our passions? Have you ever asked yourself what might happen if you ditched the nine-to-five job and lived your dream instead?...

Easy Ginger Mousse with Honey and Toasted Coconut

Serves 6 | start to finish: 3 1/2 hours (active time: 20 minutes) A mousse can serve as a refreshing end to a boldly flavored meal. It takes a few hours of foresight but, because there are no eggs, this is a comparatively easy and foolproof recipe. What you trade in ease, however, you lose in durability. It’s best to assemble this dessert right before serving, though it can withstand some time in the refrigerator if already spooned into serving cups. Do add the toasted coconut flakes right before serving, as they tend to absorb moisture and get soggy. Washington blackberry honey tastes wonderful with the ginger, but any favorite local honey will hit the spot. For the Greek yogurt, Nancy’s now...

Red Curry with Oregon Shrimp and Swiss Chard

Serves 6 | start to finish: 25 minutes Certified sustainable by the Marine Stewardship Council, Oregon bay shrimp has a mild, sweet flavor that harmonizes beautifully with this simmering, spicy curry. These tiny shrimp are previously peeled and cooked, making them ideal for whipping up a quick meal. They are often sold still a bit frosty, so if this is the case, extend the simmer time accordingly. If chard is not available, spinach makes a wonderful substitute—or try this with the first of our springtime nettles. The rich coconut milk and the tender bits of sweet shrimp make this dish feel like an indulgent treat. 2 cups dry jasmine rice, for serving with the curry 1 tablespoon canola or coconut oil 1/4 cup chopped...

Sweet Chili Roasted Broccoli

Serves 6 | start to finish: 20 minutes Roasting vegetables works magic. Contact with the hot pan creates caramelization, and the dry heat concentrates flavors. Even less flavorful stems become a joy to eat. Add garlic and sweet chili sauce and you might have a duel with forks over who gets the last, tasty bite. 1 1/2 pounds broccoli (three to four medium stalks) 3 tablespoons canola oil or other high-heat oil 1/4 teaspoon kosher salt 1 tablespoon lime juice 1 medium garlic clove, finely minced or pressed 1 teaspoon fish sauce (use soy sauce for a vegetarian version) 1 tablespoon Thai sweet chili sauce, such as Mae Ploy Preheat oven to 425°F. Tear any small leaves from the stems of the broccoli and reserve them for later. Cut the...

Lemongrass Soup with Rhubarb and Radishes

Serves 6 | start to finish: 25 minutes Spring ingredients liven up this traditional Thai soup. Chopped pieces of local rhubarb soften and melt into the broth, providing an additional pop of sour among the already bright flavors, and the radishes add a satisfying crunch and contrast to the tender chicken and mushrooms. When served over rice, this soup could stand on its own as a solid lunch or simple dinner. Best of all, this light and bold soup is a snap to make. After prepping the ingredients, simply bring everything to a boil, cover the pan, and steep it for 10 minutes like a pot of tea. You now have soup. The key is to cube the chicken small enough, and...

Thai Game

Spring in the Northwest is a slow starter, but with increasing brightness and lengthening days, people start feeling playful. There are crocuses and daffodils popping up in the parks, fresh produce in the market, and the heady feeling of a new season. Let’s have fun and play a little. For us, nothing says playful like the flavor profiles of Thailand and surrounding areas. Sweet, sour, spicy, and salty is a game where you get to pick your own hand. How hot do you like it? How sweet? We’ve given you reliable guidelines, but feel free to customize for your palate. The right balance is the one you like the most. Here the traditional sweet and sour Tom Yum soup gets a Northwest...

Corn-Millet Muffins with Roasted Red Peppers and Feta

If you’re anything like me, you may feel that corn muffins are often dry and a bit dutiful. These muffins will change your mind. They comfortably straddle the line between sweet and savory, and are packed with flavor thanks to the feta cheese and roasted red peppers. Plus, who can quibble with the bonus of whole-grain nutrition from the spelt flour, cornmeal, and millet (which gives each muffin their delightful crunch). These are always a crowd favorite. makes: 10-12 muffins | start to finish: 1 hour (active time: 15 minutes) 1 1/2 cups (195g) spelt flour 1 cup (165g) medium-grind cornmeal 1/2 cup (100g) raw millet 3 tablespoons natural cane sugar (like turbinado) 1 1/2 tablespoons baking powder 1 1/4 teaspoon kosher salt 2 large eggs, beaten 1 cup...

Chocolate-Cherry Hazelnut Cookies

These cookies are soft and slightly crumbly with a surprising crunch from the millet and a sweet fragrance thanks to the coconut oil. The whole grain flour and natural sugars make them feel almost virtuous as an afternoon snack or late morning pick-me-up while the bits of chocolate and hazelnuts give them sophistication worthy of your next special occasion. makes: 15 Cookies | start to finish: 45 minutes (active time: 15 minutes) 1 cup (170g) whole-wheat flour 3/4 cup (105g) all-purpose flour 1/3 cup (65g) raw millet 1/3 cup (60g) natural cane sugar (like turbinado) 1/2 teaspoon baking powder 1/4 teaspoon ground ginger 1/4 teaspoon ground cinnamon 1/2 teaspoon kosher salt 1/2 cup (120ml) coconut oil, melted and slightly cooled 1 large egg, beaten 2 tablespoons honey 1 teaspoon pure vanilla extract 3/4 cup...

Millet: An Unexpected Pantry Superstar

BY MEGAN GORDON I truly settled in and became at home in my own kitchen the moment I discovered baking with whole grains. Originally the change was inspired by a focus on health and a desire to avoid refined ingredients, but today the impetus is as much driven by the exciting flavors and textures each grain brings to the table. Instead of just grabbing white all-purpose flour for baking, I love the challenge of deciding which flour would make for the most interesting, complex muffin or cookie, given the ingredients I'm using, and sometimes even the season. Today I'm excited to share with you a few recipes that have been gracing our table this spring, each using my all-time favorite grain:...

Sabzi Polow: Persian Herbed Rice

Serves 6 | start to finish: 4 hours (active time: 45 hour) One of the best parts of Persian rice dishes is the toasty crust called tadigh that develops on the bottom. Sometimes this is achieved using a sheet of lavash bread or sliced potatoes, this version relies on rice. Keep an eye (and ear) on the pot to make sure it doesn’t burn. If you do manage to achieve quality tadigh, serve the pieces on top for all to enjoy. Traditionally this dish would include green garlic, which is hard to find in the Northwest in March. Adele Merati recommends tucking in a few garlic cloves to add the appropriate flavor. 4 cup basmati rice 2 teaspoons salt 4 tablespoons canola oil 1/2 cup water 6...

Soaked Kale and Spinach Salad

serves 4 – 6 | start to finish: 40 minutes (active time: 10 minutes) This vegetarian version of ohitashi, which means “soaked” in Japanese, includes kale mixed with spinach. The spinach version is often found at Japanese restaurants in Seattle, but many leafy greens work with this recipe. What makes ohitashi distinct is the preparation technique: dropping the greens into boiling water, quickly cooling them, squeezing out the liquid, then allowing the greens to absorb a flavorful dressing. 1 bunch kale 1 large bunch spinach or 8 ounces baby spinach 4 cups water 1 tablespoon salt 1 tablespoon soy or tamari sauce 1 tablespoon toasted sesame oil 1 tablespoon mirin 1 teaspoon Dijon mustard 1 teaspoon sesame seeds, for garnish Wash the greens and remove stems from the kale. Bring the water...

Japanese Rice with Sesame Salt and Celery

Serves 6 | start to finish: 30 minutes (or if soaking the rice, 1 hour) A little extra care and forethought goes into cooking good Japanese rice, but the exquisite result makes the extra steps worth it. Rinsing the rice several times gives the grains a glossy finish, with a barely sticky consistency. Soaking the rice in advance makes it tender, but not mushy. Stirring the rice to release excess steam after cooking also helps to prevent mushiness. With a little practice, preparing rice this way becomes easy. Sesame salt (gomashio in Japanese) serves as a nutritious and savory seasoning, both in Japanese cuisine and also in Macrobiotic diets. According to Macrobiotic principles, sesame seeds with rice provide a complete protein. While...

Roasted Vegetable Soup with Miso

Serves 4 | start to finish: 25 minutes A savory autumn soup hits the spot at the end of a long chilly day or even on the go, in a thermos. This soup is so rich and luscious that meat lovers might not believe the vegan ingredient list. Northwest autumns bring an array of local mushrooms to choose from. While shiitake will provide the most traditional Japanese flavor, playing with wild mushrooms from our own forests yields some wonderful results. 6 scallions 4 medium carrots 1 medium turnip 8 ounces mushrooms (chanterelle, crimini, matsutake, bolete, lobster, shiitake, or a blend) 2 tablespoons canola oil 1/2 teaspoon kosher salt 1 quart vegetable stock 4 garlic cloves, finely minced or pressed 8 ounces firm tofu, cut into 1/2 inch cubes 1/4 cup red...

Mirin Caramel Popcorn with Almonds

Makes 4 quarts | start to finish: 25 minutes Surprisingly simple to whip up at home, caramel popcorn makes an addictive snack or dessert. Using mirin (a seasoned rice wine) as a caramel base only increases its allure. The alcohol boils out as it caramelizes, leaving a subtle toasted rice flavor that will make you want just one more handful. While a variety of nuts taste great with caramel popcorn, the delicate slivered almonds accentuate the mirin flavor. 1/4 cup canola oil or other high-heat, neutral-flavored oil 2/3 cup popcorn kernels 1 1/2 cups slivered almonds 1 cup mirin 1 cup sugar 1 stick unsalted butter 1 teaspoon table salt 1/2 teaspoon baking soda Preheat oven to 250°F. Line two sheet pans with parchment or wax paper. In a large pot with...

Get Your Lunchbox

PHOTOS AND RECIPES BY ANNE LIVINGSTON Even those of us who are not students can still feel the draw of back-to-school nostalgia. This is the time to pull out the heavier sweaters, organize a few files, or just take a moment to relish the crisp air. The lure of fall comfort food awaits, too. Savory soup, caramel corn, or even a steaming bowl of rice can feed the soul when the rains come. Having some new fall recipes in your back pocket is as keen as a fresh box of crayons. Using Japanese ingredients—vegetarian ones, no less—adds a smart twist to comfort foods that taste equally good at lunch or at dinner. Soaked spinach and kale salad, shaped in elegant, bite-sized pieces,...

Bring on the Kiwi Berries

Every year Burnt Ridge, Dolan’s fruit- and nut-growing operation located east of Chehalis, harvests thousands of pounds of hardy kiwifruits from 200 cultivated vines—grown on trellises, not in the forest canopy. The wooden and wire bracing groans beneath the weight of the grape-sized, fuzzless fruits....

On the Cider Route

When Crystie Kisler describes her farm, Finnriver, as being “Shangri La, a little piece of paradise,” she’s spot on....

The Wild Life

BY LANGDON COOK The rain came early last fall. It fell in a torrent in mid-August, a gullywasher that surprised the hikers and backpackers who count on a dry spell in late summer. Not everyone was disappointed. The first hints of a bountiful harvest came near the end of the month, when it was time to pick mountain huckleberries. Peeking from beneath the dense foliage were shiny, rain-burnished caps of porcini mushrooms, pounds and pounds of them. You needed another bucket. Mushroom hunters, like Major League ballplayers, are a superstitious lot. They don’t get too excited. Nature is fickle. Get too excited and she swats you. But the rain came again just when it was needed. Even casual fungi-fanciers started to notice....

Provisions Mushroom Farm

Olympia fungi farmers have culture STORY AND PHOTOS BY JENNIFER CRAIN Christian Kaelin piles sterilized straw onto a stainless steel table in the outdoor workspace at Provisions Mushroom Farm. He tears the corner off a plastic bag and scatters its contents—a millet-based mushroom spawn—over the top. Attendees at the farm’s daylong mushroom cultivation workshop are soon combining straw and spawn with their hands and packing the mixture into plastic bags. The group is making mushroom substrates, blocks of material that will sprout blue oyster mushrooms, one of twelve culinary varieties Christian and Ria Kaelin cultivate at their homestead, on the edge of Capitol State Forest near Olympia. Since 2006, the Kaelins have provided wild and cultivated specialty mushrooms for their CSA subscribers through Helsing...

On the Mushroom Trail

local author and wild foods forager, Langdon Cook, would rather be in the woods BY TARA AUSTEN WEAVER Langdon Cook doesn’t actually spend that much time in the kitchen—not if he can help it. “I live where I do, because I can be on Tiger Mountain in 15-20 minutes,” he says of his Mt. Baker neighborhood. Cook prefers the woods, the mountains, the coast. He’s happy to trade his kitchen for a campfire or rustic cabin. It was time spent outdoors, however, that brought this journalist to cooking. Since moving to Seattle in 1991 he’s become an avid forager: mushrooms and huckleberries in the fall, nettles, razor clams, and fiddlehead ferns in spring. It was the extraordinary quality of these wild edibles that...

Bellewood Acres Distillery

“We bought 30 acres of perfect soil in a perfect setting with our three perfect farm hands—our children,”...

Blackberry and Hazelnut Layer Cake with White Chocolate

RECIPE AND PHOTOS BY PAOLA THOMAS It’s that time of year when we’re clinging desperately to the last golden vestiges of summer, but getting ready for the warm earthy flavors of fall. This cake elegantly bridges the seasons, making use of the final berries of summer while incorporating autumn’s first hazelnuts. Sometimes the in-between season can be the most delicious. The frosting here is a perfect vehicle for the tart, smeary spoils of blackberry picking, as unblemished shapely fruits are not required (you could even use frozen berries, just make sure to thaw and let them drain thoroughly first). The cake is a traditional English sponge but incorporates local hazelnut flour, which mellows the sweetness and marries perfectly with white chocolate. We’ve...

Simple & Crisp

in her SODO production kitchen, Jane Yuan is reinventing the cracker STORY BY EMILY HORTON PHOTOS BY JIM HENKENS AND ANNIE BRADY Most of us have a few memories of a meal or a dish that stand out, vivid, even when we've forgotten everything else around it. We may not remember the details, but we know that moment changed things—and spoiled us for anything similar. For Jane Yuan, former publicist and founder of Seattle-based Simple & Crisp, the idea of a life-changing meal isn't hyperbole. Several years ago, Yuan was having dinner in at a restaurant in Los Angeles, where she was living at the time, when a feature of the dessert course—a thin, candied orange slice—caught her off guard. The flavor was intense;...

Sept/Oct 2014 Letter from the Editor

A friend of mine remembers when she first moved to Seattle from the East Coast in the late 1960s. “I couldn’t believe it,” she says. “All anyone wanted to talk about were hiking and mushrooms!” I don’t know about you, but that suits me just fine. It’s true there are people who hate mushrooms (one of them in my family, even), but wild mushrooms are one of the boons of the Northwest. Some of us anticipate the first rains of fall. That moisture wakes up the mushrooms that have gone dormant for the summer and soon they emerge from the forest floor, pushing their way through fallen pine needles and into the light: coppery-colored chanterelles, white, rounded matsutaki, and the highly sought-after...

July/Aug 2014 Farm to Table

Putting Down Roots Viva Farms incubator is helping grow a new crop of organic farmers STORY AND PHOTOS BY JESSAMYN TUTTLE It's a fine breezy day in the Skagit Valley, the sun is out, and Nelida Martinez is ready to plant, setting out tray after tray of seedlings on her plot at the Viva Farms farm incubator outside of Mount Vernon. Martinez, who farms five and a half acres split between her plot here and another one a few miles away, is a powerhouse of energy. She works her farm alone ("Sometimes my husband comes to help me a little bit," she says, "un poquito"). Her children help run her stand at the Mount Vernon farmers’ market, where she sells berries and vegetables...

Washington Rose’

How France’s Favorite Seasonal Wine Won Washington Over...

“BLT” Barley Bowl with Creamy Avocado Dressing

All the ingredients that make a BLT most memorable join forces in this delicious whole-grain lunch bowl (or dinner side dish). I use spinach here in place of lettuce because it maintains its integrity and doesn’t get soggy; feel free to use any hearty green you’d like. And while the dressing quantity may seem like a lot, the barley soaks up quite a bit. We use and relish every last spoonful. For a true summer timesaver, cook your barley and bacon in advance, so you’re simply folding together ingredients when the salad craving strikes. Serves 6 as a small side; 4 as a light entrée | start to finish: 1 hour (active time: 15 minutes) For the Dressing (Makes 1 cup/240ml): 1 ripe...

Barley: An Easy Summer Stunner

BY MEGAN GORDON Summer is the season for simple cooking and spontaneous meals—heaping bowls of berries and yogurt for breakfast; plates of juicy tomatoes and a few slices of salty cheese for lunch. While it doesn’t necessarily get so hot in the Northwest that standing in front of the oven is an impossibility, many of us relish the time outdoors in our yards or parks—leaving less for elaborate recipes or menus. Recipes that utilize leftover grains or bake-ahead pastries are a summertime win in my book. If you’re new to barley, it’s a hearty grain that packs a real punch of flavor and nutrition. When you shop for this ancient grain you can choose from hulled or pearl barley—sometimes also called “pearled.”...

Summer Slaw with Basil and Apple

serves 6 |start to finish: 15 minutes This coleslaw is a refreshing spin on the traditional slaw found at many a southern cookout. Southern coleslaw is typically sweetened with sugar and heavy on the mayo. While that version surely hits a spot, a lighter slaw—using the natural sweetness of apples instead of processed sugar—can satisfy just as well. Serve this just-tossed or store it, dressed and covered in the fridge, for up to a day before serving. 1 small head or 1/2 large head cabbage—green, napa, purple, or a combination of two 1 large carrot 1 large apple 1/2 cup basil leaves 1/4 cup mayonnaise 1/4 cup extra virgin olive oil 1/2 teaspoon table salt 2 tablespoons lemon juice 1 tablespoon cider vinegar Shred the cabbage and grate the carrot. Place...

Sweet Tea and Grape Granita

serves 6 |start to finish: 4 hours; active time: 15 minutes Nothing says “The South” like a tall glass of sweet tea. As the name implies, it takes a remarkable amount of sugar to create the perfect version—so sweet it could be dessert. When frozen into granita form, this is exactly what happens. Fresh grapes add a tart and fruity note that harmonizes with cooling mint. Even if you’re not a fan of sweet tea, this refreshing combination may have you going back for more. 7 black tea bags, a balanced flavor such as English Breakfast (decaffeinated is fine) 1/4 cup fresh mint leaves, rinsed 1 quart cool, filtered water 1 cup sugar 2 cups or 1 tray of ice cubes 2 cups red seedless grapes, washed Place...

Three Sisters Griddle Cakes

makes about 25 small griddle cakes | start to finish: 20 minutes “The Three Sisters”—corn, beans, and squash—have been grown as companion plants for thousands of years by indigenous people all over the continent. The tradition continues today among modern gardeners. The crops are mutually beneficial: tall corn stalks provide a climbing structure for beans, which in turn provide nitrogen for the other plants. Squash vines create natural groundcover, inhibiting weed growth and providing beneficial microclimates. Following the old adage, “If it grows together, it goes together,” The Three Sisters combine well, including these griddle cakes. These small cakes work as a casual appetizer when spread with butter or fresh goat cheese, or as a side dish to barbecue—perfect for mopping up...

Righteous Barbecued Ribs

serves 4 | start to finish: 4 hours 45 minutes Some might describe these pork ribs as “Texas Style” barbecue. Others have characterized them as “Oh my gosh—please tell me you have more of these.” Either way, they are remarkably easy to make. The lore of barbecue techniques and its myriad magic tricks can be intimidating. Mark my words, though: making incredible ribs without a ton of experience is within reach, even without a grill. This recipe works great with both back ribs (sometimes called baby back or loin back ribs) or with spareribs. A rack of spareribs is larger and flatter but will still work with the amount of rub and sauce listed—there will simply be less sauce left over for...

Cookout or Cook-In: Seattle Goes South

BY ANNE LIVINGSTON In Seattle, we need a backup plan. A summer outdoor wedding can wind up in the house, under a tent, or holding umbrellas. Our hiking backpacks include sunblock and shades, but also extra layers and a raincoat. And a southern-style cookout? Even in the more reliable month of August, there’s still a chance of the meal coming inside. Not to mention, some of us don’t actually own a grill or smoker. Good news: with all bets against it, we can still heed the call of barbecue. There are ways to enjoy a picnic hot off the grill—or sneakily prepared in the kitchen. The best barbecues boast a platter of saucy ribs with a side of coleslaw. These southern favorites...

Chicken Coconut Curry with Eggplant and Bamboo Shoots

Recipe courtesy Wiley and PK Frank, Little Uncle When using fresh curry paste, it is important to fry the paste first, before adding your desired liquids, flavorings, and garnishes. This releases flavor and improves the color of the final curry. This recipe is fairly standard, but the sky is the limit for what you want to put in it—try different meats, vegetables, or even some fresh turmeric and dry roasted spices to give it a Southern Thai flavor. Canned coconut milk creates a thicker curry and requires more stock to thin to a desired consistency. Making your own fresh coconut milk yields a lighter, more vibrant curry with a reddish sheen on top, a desirable characteristic. serves: 2 | start to finish:...

Jul/Aug 2014 In the Kitchen

Roasted Chilies and Creativity Little Uncle combines Thai food culture with local flair BY TARA AUSTEN WEAVER When you walk down the stairs to Little Uncle’s belowground Pioneer Square restaurant, you may smell the fragrance of roasting peppers floating up from the kitchen. This is only the first sign that you are in for Thai food unlike any you have ever tasted before, either here or in Thailand. Little Uncle is a collaboration between husband and wife team PK and Wiley Frank, who met as art students at the University of Washington. PK (full name: Poncharee) was born in Thailand and lived there until the age nine, while Wiley grew up on Vashon Island, playing around in his parents’ kitchen. “When I was a kid...

Ayako and Family Jam

The quality of Gordon’s jam has the power to turn people nostalgic. “People say it reminds them of their grandmother’s jam, or spending time in the countryside picking fruit,” Gordon says. “I love to hear that people enjoy it—that helps keep me going.”...

Jul/Aug 2014 Urban Foraging

Preserving on a Smaller Scale This is the time of year to turn crates of fruit and vegetables into jam, pickles, chutneys, and more. For those without a farm family to feed, Marisa McClellan’s new book, Preserving by the Pint: Quick Seasonal Canning for Small Spaces, provides inspiration and ideas galore. Divided in seasons, with recipes both sweet and savory, like Sorrel Pesto (spring), Blueberry Maple Jam (summer), Quick Pickled Fennel with Orange (fall), and Quince Slices in Chai Tea Syrup (winter). McClellan, who is also author of the cookbook and blog Food in Jars, provides an appealing way to experiment with the world of seasonal preserving. The Summer of the Ice Pop What comes after artisanal ice cream? Ice pops, of course....

Jul/Aug 2014 Letter from the Editor

One day I was chatting with a favorite farmers’ market vendor about summer meals at long tables and she told me to watch "Antonia’s Line," a quirky Dutch film about a woman who builds a life and family in a small village after World War II. She thought I would like it. “They have these great outdoor luncheon scenes,” she said. “Over the years the table they sit at gets longer and longer—they add to it as more people join the meal.” I loved that image. This time of year I dream about long tables set outdoors—be it an urban backyard, a picnic in the woods, or an open field at one of the many local farm-to-table dinners. It’s so much of...

Le Grand Aïoli

each summer, in villages across Provence, the community gathers for a feast BY GEORGEANNE BRENNAN AND TARA AUSTEN WEAVER This time of year I long to be in the South of France—and not for the beaches, lavender fields, or small stone cottages either. It’s a festival I want to attend, and a meal as well. In the late summer, throughout the region of Provence, long tables and chairs are set out in town squares and villagers gather to celebrate the annual feast of Le Grand Aioli. Noted cookbook author Georgeanne Brennan first encountered this tradition when she and her family moved to a small Provencal town in the 1970s. “A group of teenagers came knocking on our door, giggling and laughing,” she said,...

The Significance of Raspberries

BY DAYTONA STRONG In my earliest sun-drenched memories of raspberries I am a little girl, maybe five or six years old. Squatting down between rows of bushes in my grandparents’ Ballard garden, I brush canopies of leaves aside to search for every last berry. They hide under leaves that are like cocoons protecting larvae; a second pass might uncover one or two still slumbering in their shade. Today each raspberry I taste brings me back to that place—the cool, blue-hued basement kitchen opposite the garden, my skin radiating the warmth of the sun as I slurp bowlfuls of just-picked berries sprinkled with sugar and topped with a generous pour of cream. Each bite of that summer concoction my Grandma Adeline served tasted...

Final Course July/Aug 2014

BY ERICA BAUERMEISTER We moved house a few years ago, to a small Victorian seaport about two hours away from Seattle. Life has changed, in so many ways. Now there is a yellow plum tree outside my office window. I didn’t notice it at first—a small thing, crammed between an evergreen and a buckeye, the result of a United Nations approach to landscaping favored by the former owner. But late that first August, I looked out my window to see that the tree had simply exploded with fruit, golden globes incandescent against green leaves. I went outside and stood among the branches. It was a stunning extravagance of produce—overwhelming, in fact. Far too many for us to eat, too full of juice...

Arugula Salad with Toasted Chèvre and Spring Blossoms

BY ANNE LIVINGSTON Serves 4 | start to finish: 30 minutes (active time: 10 minutes) Any assortment of edible flower petals, from spicy nasturtiums to mellow tulips or pansies, taste and look delectable with peppery arugula. Because the flowers are too delicate to be rinsed before eating, use only flowers that have not been sprayed. Even dandelion petals (from a pesticide-free front yard) can add festive color and healthful properties. Other places to find edible flowers are the farmers’ market (again, make sure the flowers are not sprayed). Some grocery stores also carry containers of edible flowers in the fresh herb section of the produce department. 2 tablespoons lemon juice 1 tablespoon Dijon mustard 1 teaspoon honey 1/4 teaspoon kosher salt 1/4 cup plus 1 tablespoon extra...

Spring Pea Polenta with Garlic and Ham

BY ANNE LIVINGSTON Serves 4 | start to finish: 25 minutes The combination of peas and ham is a wickedly delicious late spring comfort food. Add this to creamy polenta to make a satisfying springtime lunch or side dish. It is light enough to enjoy on a sunny porch, yet robust enough to strengthen your soul on a Seattle “June-uary” day. You can add any part of the pea plant—sprout, shoot, pod, or pea—to this polenta. If you do use pea shoots or sprouts, though, make sure that they are very young or they will be too woody to enjoy. Taste a shoot raw to check for maturity, and if it is too chewy, snip off the tendrils to use in the...

Buttery Sole Poached with Spring Vegetables

BY ANNE LIVINGSTON Serves 4 | start to finish: 15 minutes The combination of fennel, onions, chiogga beets, carrots, and butter creates a sweet, rich background for sole’s delicate flavor. Because a sole filet is so thin, it cooks quickly—and the less it is disturbed or moved, the better. This recipe requires no manipulation, because the fish steams in the pan right over the vegetables, then thinly sliced fennel stalks add a refreshing crunch and a hit of subtle, sweet anise flavor. This dish is quite saucy, making it a great partner for a rice or polenta dish, such as the ham and spring pea polenta included here. 1 bulb fennel, including stalks and fronds 1 small yellow onion 6 young slender carrots, peeled or...

Strawberry Upside-down Pound Cake

BY ANNE LIVINGSTON Serves 10 | start to finish: 1 1/2 hours Springtime rewards us for our patience with luscious strawberries straight from the garden or market. Left uneaten for a couple of days, however, their shiny plumpness begins to fade. Layered into a simple upside-down pound cake though, strawberries don’t need to be perfect. Baking turns tired strawberries luxuriously jammy—especially combined with brown sugar and black pepper, which intensifies the flavor of the berries. After baking and flipping this cake, prepare to love strawberries in a whole new way. Serve with more sliced fresh berries, and even a scoop of ice cream, to create a multidimensional strawberry celebration. Leftover cake can be covered and kept at room temperature or in the refrigerator....

May/June 2014 Cooking Fresh

Garden Party BY ANNE LIVINGSTON “Leaf, root, flower, fruit”—this catchy phrase is used by gardeners to refer to crop rotation. It’s also a good reminder of what our meals have been missing lately. After months of roots and hearty winter leaves (are you tired of kale yet?), early summer comes with an explosion of flowers, berries, and tender lettuces. Now that everyone’s here, it’s time to get the party started. These days I like to scatter salads with spring blossoms and petals, balancing the spiciness of arugula with warm, toasted goat cheese. Buttery sole with tender spring vegetables, and garlicky polenta with fresh peas, both celebrate this time of year when spring turns into summer. Finally, strawberries—the first berries of the...

May/June 2014 The Skagit Valley

Savoring the Skagit the edible wonders of Bow and Edison BY MEGAN HILL The sprawl of Burlington and Mount Vernon are behind me after just a couple of traffic circles, the neat rows of potatoes and almost-neon green pasture reaching towards the gentle blue-gray swell of the Chuckanut Mountains. A bald eagle floats overhead and the sun glints off an upper slope of Mount Baker. The scent of hay and fresh earth waft in the open window and the city feels much further than the one-hour drive behind us. Chuckanut Drive connects Burlington to Bellingham via the scenic route, passing farms and dairies before climbing into the coastal mountains separating Skagit County from Whatcom. The enchanting scenery is one reason to come all this...

May/June 2014 The Grain Gathering

The Grain Gathering three days in the wheat fields at bread camp BY JESSAMYN TUTTLE On a crisp, late summer morning, just as the sun was coming up, I found myself in a grassy field eating bagels. The field was part of the WSU extension campus in Mount Vernon, the bagels were hot out of a wood-fired oven and steaming in the cold air, and my companions were several dozen cheerful bakers, farmers, millers, maltsters, and amateur bread enthusiasts, all up early and ready to start another day at The Grain Gathering (formerly Kneading Conference West). The three-day conference was packed with knowledgeable people eager to learn from each other. At one end of the campus, a mud-spattered group worked together to build an...

May/June 2014 Snoqualmie Ice Cream

Churning Up Sustainability Snoqualmie Ice Cream is as delicious as it is environmental STORY BY GRACE HENSLEY PHOTOS BY GRACE HENSLEY AND LYNNE HARRISON It took ten years to make the honey-lavender ice cream that is slowly melting in my cup, but the journey started even earlier. In 1997, Barry Bettinger and his wife Shahnaz left their hometown in northern New York to buy the small gourmet Snoqualmie Ice Cream company, then located in Lynnwood, WA. Barry had grown up on his father’s award-winning conservation farm, eventually becoming a dairy plant manager, but harbored a dream of running his own business. “It was either ice cream or cheese,” says Snoqualmie marketing manager Samantha Hill, “as long as they could work together.” In 2003, the...

May/June 2014 Final Course

  Tasting Sunlight BY GREG ATKINSON I used to think of the seasons as a linear chain; now I see them as part of the same kaleidoscope, or facets of a gemstone. Each spring is colored by reflections of seasons past. This year, I tell myself, as I watch the leeks volunteer at the back of my garden and take a hand trowel to the weeds in the rhubarb patch, I will make something wonderful with this produce. And in the cold clear light of spring, it all seems doable. The march of spring produce into markets seems orderly enough at first: tender young nettles for soups and purees, then the glorious, frost-sweetened sprouts of plants that over-wintered, like the jade green side shoots...

May/June 2014 Farm to Table

Life Lessons and Strawberries growing for a new generation on the Thulen Family Farm BY TARA AUSTEN WEAVER If you follow Dodge Valley Road near La Conner far enough—through the woods and along open fields—you will pass a handsome farmhouse, set back from the road and surrounded by a tidy garden. Keep an eye out for the nearby horse pasture—that’s the three-acre plot that Gail Thulen planted with seed peas in 1960. That bit of Skagit Valley farmland was the beginning of it all. From this small start the farm grew—over the next fifty-four years—to some 800 acres of potatoes, cabbage (grown for seed), mustard, wheat, leeks, carrots, beets, and more peas. But it is a strawberry crop that holds special significance to the...

Summer Fruit Pavlovas with Strawberries, Mixed Fruits, or Roasted Cherries

Summer Fruit Pavlovas with Strawberries, Mixed Fruits, or Roasted Cherries PHOTOS AND RECIPE BY PAOLA THOMAS I often bring pavlovas to summer parties—this ethereal combination of whipped meringue, cream, and fruit as airy and spectacular as a ballerina’s tutu. When I first came to Seattle, I noticed that friends begged me to make them again and again. I soon realized the pavlova is not well-known in America. Both Australia and New Zealand claim to have invented the dessert—a subject of contentious debate—but it was clearly named in honor of the Russian ballerina Anna Pavlova. It’s also naturally gluten-free and fabulously easy to make. If you can whip eggs and cream, you can make pavlova. Some people are a little intimidated by meringue, but once...

Capitol Cider

Julie Tall has a motto, "Don't jump halfway across the ravine." In opening Capitol Cider, Seattle’s first cider-focused pub, in June of 2013, Tall made the jump, and a huge leap of faith as well....

May/June 2014 Artisans

Strut Your Sauce de Mars’s rooster sauce is heating up BY JENNIFER CRAIN De Mars’s Rooster Sauce was created in the tiny kitchen of an apartment in Virginia, where first year law student John de Mars spent his evenings experimenting with a high-speed blender. He popped chile pepper stems into a paper bag on the floor, smashed garlic cloves, and measured dried spices. For two weeks he made batch after batch of hot sauce, until he was happy with the result. The concoction soon became popular on campus. His fellow students ate the deep orange sauce in spades, livening up platefuls of potluck fare or slathering it on morning eggs from bottles de Mars sent home with them. One friend purchased in bulk, to...

May/June 2014 In the Kitchen

  Building Delancey a marriage, and the restaurant, book, bar, and baby that came from it BY TARA AUSTEN WEAVER You may have heard the story already: girl leaves graduate school and starts a food blog. Boy on East Coast reads the blog and falls for the girl, sends her a charming note. Girl meets boy; he moves to Seattle; they get married. The plan is to live happily ever after. Not so fast, the road rarely runs that straight. Sometimes there are detours for pizza. When Seattle food writer Molly Wizenberg married Brandon Pettit in 2007, she expected they would have a fairly quiet life together. She would write and he—a PhD student in music composition who worked in restaurants on the side—would teach music...

May/June 2014 Urban Foraging

Still In Season When Greg Atkinson’s book In Season was first published in 1997, he was a young chef learning his craft on San Juan Island. Today he runs his own Restaurant Marché on Bainbridge and In Season is being reissued. Atkinson’s writing is always lovely (see our Final Course essay this issue for a sample), but what is striking is how this book predates current trends—seasonal cooking, wild food foraging, eating local. Divided in seasons, each chapter paired with a recipe, In Season rings just as true to life in the Pacific Northwest now as it did seventeen years ago. Illustrated with evocative seasonal images by Seattle photographer Charity Burggraaf, In Season is a reminder of how rich and rooted...

Editor Letter May/June 2014

Do you have a strawberry memory from childhood? I’m sad to say I don’t. Growing up we had blackberries and a small patch of raspberries, but strawberries did not have a place in our garden. I now think of this as a shame. I grow strawberries in my garden now, a huge patch of them. Every spring I look forward to their delicate white flowers. Among local growers and food connoisseurs, Shuksan and Hood varieties seem to be the favorite. People complain that squirrels get all their berries, but in my experience you just have to plant more. Once my patch had filled in, I found the squirrels ate about 20% and left me the rest. I don’t mind sharing. I still don’t...

Celebrating Spring

Family and feasting at Persian New Year BY TARA AUSTEN WEAVER Growing up in Seattle, Nazila Merati always knew when it getting close to Persian New Year. “All of a sudden there would be plates covered in muslin left in the sunny spots around the house,” she said. “That’s how I knew things were beginning.” The plates held wheat, mung beans, and lentils, which were being sprouted for the traditional New Year’s altar, the Haft Sin. The sprouted grains and beans, as well as the thorough spring-cleaning her mother undertook, were the first signs of the approaching holiday. The next sign was the baking. “My mother made rice flour cookies, chickpea flour cookies, baklava, almond and walnut macarons,” Nazila remembers. “She would start making them...

Reclaiming the Donut

How “olykoeks” went from the kitchen to coffee shop BY BETH MAXEY I remember the exact moment I realized it was possible to make donuts at home. My mom was reading one of The Little House on the Prairie books to my sister and me. The men had gotten up before sunrise to tend to the animals and the women were making a breakfast like I’d never heard of before: bacon and coffee and eggs and pancakes with maple syrup and butter and porridge and donuts, fried at home, on the stove, in lard. I turned to my mom. “You can’t make donuts at home.” She cocked her head at me, like she didn’t quite understand. “Sure you can,” she said. “I used...

The Call of the Nettles

BY WREN JONES The call goes out early in spring: "Are you busy? The nettles are up." No one says no. Nettles are the first ritual of spring. We meet in a parking lot near the woods: bags, scissors, gloves in hand. There is a thermos of nettle tea, an infusion made from the dried leaves of the previous year. Steeped in hot water the brew is vegetal and brisk, it warms us up on this still early spring morning. The woods are at that turning point: pale fresh growth coming through the rotting layers of winter. The dark is giving way to the light, the new triumphs over the old. We step carefully, avoiding mud and muck, looking for the serrated leaves of...

Farm to Computer to Table

Janelle Maiocco, in her Seattle backyard with some of her flock, seeks to use technology to close the food-purchasing gap. Farmstr uses technology to connect local food producers and consumers STORY BY REBEKAH DENN PHOTO BY TARA AUSTEN WEAVER Janelle Maiocco’s father grew up on a dairy farm in Whatcom County, and she often visited as a child. “I’m familiar with the smell of manure,” she said. “I put in my time in the berry fields.” The land was sold, though, one of hundreds of small Washington dairy farms that couldn’t survive the economics of modern farming. And that was just one of the twists and turns in the Seattle woman’s life that led her to co-found Farmstr.com, an online business connecting small and medium-sized...

The Flavors of Home

Xinh Dwelley blends the freshest seafood with the spices of Vietnam STORY BY TARA AUSTEN WEAVER PHOTOS BY KELLY CLINE As a child growing up in southern Vietnam, Xinh Dwelley never expected to run a seafood restaurant. Growing up she never even did any cooking. “My mother did all the cooking,” she explains. “I went to work in the rice fields with my father.” It’s just one of the surprising aspects of her life. “Eventually I got old enough to make rice,” Dwelley says, “but it was hard. We were cooking over fire and you had to get the charcoal exactly right. I was always burning it or making it too watery,” she laughs. She didn’t start cooking until she found herself working in...

Rise of the Rhone

The vineyards of Syncline Wine Cellars, where James Mantone grows the Rhone varietal Mourvèdre...

Jonboy Caramels

If there ever was an edible that embodied the principle of “less is more,” it’s Jonboy Caramels....

Urban Foraging

  Pok Pok Without the Drive Seeing that we’ve driven Portland just to have dinner at Pok Pok, Andy Ricker’s cult favorite restaurant, we were delighted to hear he had a cookbook in the works. The wait is over and our Thai favorites are now between two covers. But this cookbook is more than just a collection of recipes. Part memoir, part travelogue, all Thai food manifesto, this book will give you an education in words and gorgeous photos (so you know what a betel leaf actually looks like). Now, instead of a three-hour drive, we can head to our own kitchen and whip up batches of laap, naam phrik plaa thuu, and phat si ew. Our gas budget—and our stomachs—will be...

Letter from the Editor

When I stepped in as editor of Edible Seattle, the first thing I worried about was how on earth I could possibly replace Jess Thomson, our Cooking Fresh columnist of six years. Starting with the very first issue, Jess worked hard to develop tempting recipes for us, she set the flavor of the magazine. While she was developing recipes for us, she was also developing a thriving career as a cookbook author. We’re sorry to see her step down, but we’re enjoying the books she is putting out in the world: Pike Place Market Recipes, Top Pot Hand-Forged Doughnuts, Dishing up Washington, and there’s a new collaboration with Renee Erickson in the works. But how to replace her? The Cooking Fresh column is...

Spicy Warm

BY ANNE LIVINGSTON We rarely, if ever, use umbrellas in Seattle. Instead our strategy for winter is to hide, sometimes for months. When was the last time you saw your friends? Yeah, same here. Winter hibernation is tempting and comfortable, but why not invite friends over to spend a wet, cold night together? You can warm up by raiding your spice cabinet. A red ginger cider—spiked with apple brandy if you like—will start the evening off. A stew of spicy, coffee-braised beef studded with sweet butternut squash warms things up, while bitter greens tossed with cumin vinaigrette cleanses the palate. By the time you’ve caught up on old times, you’ll be ready for warm pears sautéed with toasted almonds and dried cherries....

Red Cider Zipper

serves 6 |start to finish: 25 minutes Fresh cider is available at many Seattle farmers’ markets throughout the winter and makes a wonderful base for this hot drink. Ginger gives it a spicy kick, and the hibiscus and rosehip tea lends a tart pucker and a red glow. You might find it difficult to stop drinking, either straight from the pot or spiked with brandy and bitters. Perhaps a double batch is in order. 1 quart apple cider, preferably fresh 8 whole cloves 8 allspice berries 3 cinnamon sticks 3 inches of fresh ginger, sliced about 1/4 inch thick 5 orange slices, including rind 4 tea bags of red hibiscus and rosehip herbal tea, such as Red Zinger or Tazo Passion 2 cups boiling water 1 tablespoons honey (optional) 9 fluid...

Spicy Coffee-braised Beef with Pink Pickled Onions

Serves 6 | start to finish: 4 1/2 hours (active time: 30 minutes) If you like your meat very spicy, more chili powder or even cayenne will turn up the heat. The pickled onion is more than just a beautiful garnish; it adds a bright dimension and balance to the deep flavors of the beef. If there is any leftover meat, shred it with a fork for a fantastic taco filling. for the braised beef 3 tablespoons olive oil, divided 2 pounds beef chuck, cut into 1” to 2” cubes 2 1/2 teaspoons salt, plus more to taste 1 medium onion, chopped 10 garlic cloves, peeled 2 cups brewed coffee 2 oranges, juiced (about 2/3 cup) 1/2 cup ruby port, or other fortified red wine 1/4 teaspoon allspice 2 teaspoons Ancho chili...

Breeding a Better Beef

Skagit River Ranch’s Secret Quest for Tenderness BY REBEKAH DENN George Vojkovich spent 15 years trying to breed the best Angus cattle possible on the land he and wife Eiko farm in the Skagit Valley. He tweaked the minerals in his soil, tinkered with the animal feed, and carefully considered the genetic crosses in his calves, all on the way to making their Skagit River Ranch beef a favorite among sustainably-minded diners and chefs. Michael Pollan is a fan. The couple's hallmark phrase is that they wouldn't sell any food they wouldn't feed their own daughter. For several years, it turns out, the couple had a secret side project that they weren't ready to feed to anyone. “Everyone knows grassfed beef is good for the...

Not Your Supermarket Spud

the Makah Ozette offers a taste of Washington history BY MEGAN HILL The Makah Ozette potato isn’t your average fingerling. The leggy, four-foot-tall plant has a wildness to it. The resulting tubers are bumpy and pockmarked with eyes but have a rich and nutty flavor. They take longer than most potatoes to reach maturity. This unruliness hints at the potato’s storied history, which began in South America, where all potatoes originated. Spanish explorers brought potatoes home to Europe around 1570 and incorporated them into their diet. From there they were carried to North America on the ships of European colonists. That’s where the Ozette’s story differs from that of your average Russet or Yukon Gold. A 2004 Washington State University (WSU) analysis showed the...

Cream of Kale Stem Soup

serves 4|start to finish: 1 hour So many recipes call for kale leaves, but what about the stems? They must be good for something. When a friend mentioned she had made cream of kale stem soup, we got curious. The method is similar to a cream of broccoli or asparagus, but uses kale steams instead (you can use a mix of broccoli stems and kale stems, for a milder flavor). This soup works best with stems from Red Russian, Siberian, or curly kale varieties that are thicker and juicer (you can sneak a few Lacinato/Dino kale stems in, but make sure they make up less than 1/4 of the full amount). This soup uses a lot of stems—store them in a...

Agate Pass Café’s Kale Apple Salad with Maple Vinaigrette

serves 4|start to finish: 45 minutes Rebecca Slattery, of Persephone Farm, has been growing kale for more than twenty years and says this kale salad, from chef and owner of Agate Pass Café Marty Bracken, is her favorite. It’s an upscale version, studded with pancetta and crunchy with radicchio and apple. This would make a sophisticated dish for a holiday luncheon or dinner. for the candied pecans: 2 cups pecans 1/2 cup powdered sugar 1/2 teaspoon cayenne pepper 1/2 teaspoon salt for the maple vinaigrette: 2 tablespoons minced shallot 1 tablespoon stone ground mustard 1 tablespoon champagne vinegar 2 tablespoons white balsamic vinegar 1/2 teaspoon dried thyme 1/4 teaspoon fresh rosemary, minced 1 egg yolk 2 tablespoons maple syrup 3/4 cup canola oil salt and pepper to taste for the salad: 2 cups radicchio, shredded 6 cups lacinato kale (also...

All Hail The Kale

the ancient food of peasants makes a roaring comeback BY ABRA BENNETT It’s a warm, blue-skied day on Persephone Farm in Indianola and the long rows of kale are nodding agreeably to each other, even though they prefer cooler weather. Farmer and chief kale evangelist Rebecca Slattery walks through the rows, gathering a festive bouquet of the blue-green Brassicas, naming each as she picks them: White Russian, Black Magic Lacinato, Beedy’s Camden, Siberian Frill, Red Ursa, regular Lacinato (also called Cavolo Nero, Tuscan or Dinosaur Kale), Red Russian, and Dwarf Curled Siberian. Slattery’s enthusiasm for kale knows no bounds. “Kale really is my favorite vegetable,” she swears. “I like it because it’s so versatile. I feel like you can just throw it in...

Sautéed Pears with Toasted Almonds and Dried Cherries

BY ANNE LIVINGSTON serves 6 | start to finish: 15 minutes From Edible Seattle, Jan/Feb 2014 Pick up the last pears of the season and enjoy them warm and saucy with whipped cream, crème fraiche or ice cream. You can remove the skin, but some people appreciate the flavor, color and nutritional value of the peel. Firm pears such as Bosc or Anjou work best for sautéing, since they retain their shape even when caramelizing in the pan. To keep this texture, the fruit should not be overly ripe. 4 firm pears 5 tablespoons unsalted butter, divided 1/4 cup slivered almonds 1/4 cup dried cherries 1/4 cup ruby port 1/4 cup honey 1/4 cup water 1/2 teaspoon ground cardamom 1/2 teaspoon vanilla extract Your choice of whipped cream, crème fraiche or vanilla ice...

bitter greens salad with orange cumin vinaigrette

BY ANNE LIVINGSTON serves 6 | start to finish: 15 minutes From Edible Seattle, Jan/Feb 2014 Several farmers at the market are able to coax lovely bitter greens in the winter. Find what looks good to you and match them with sunny citrus and savory cumin for a refreshing yet warming bitter bite. 3 small assorted heads of bitter greens, such as chicory, frisée, radicchio, or mustard greens 5 oranges 2 tablespoon white wine vinegar 1 small shallot, finely minced 1 teaspoon cumin 1/2 teaspoon salt 1/2 teaspoon black pepper 2 teaspoons Dijon mustard 1/2 cup extra virgin olive oil Wash the greens thoroughly, dry and tear into bite-sized pieces. With a microplane grater, zest and juice one of the oranges. This should yield about 1/3 cup of juice. Blend together the zest, juice,...

Red Cider Zipper

BY ANNE LIVINGSTON serves 6 |start to finish: 25 minutes From Edible Seattle, Jan/Feb 2014 Fresh cider is available at many Seattle farmers’ markets throughout the winter and makes a wonderful base for this hot drink. Ginger gives it a spicy kick, and the hibiscus and rosehip tea lends a tart pucker and a red glow. You might find it difficult to stop drinking, either straight from the pot or spiked with brandy and bitters. Perhaps a double batch is in order. 1 quart apple cider, preferably fresh 8 whole cloves 8 allspice berries 3 cinnamon sticks 3 inches of fresh ginger, sliced about 1/4 inch thick 5 orange slices, including rind 4 tea bags of red hibiscus and rosehip herbal tea, such as Red Zinger or Tazo Passion 2 cups...

Little Brown Farm

one teenager plus eight kids begets a goat dairy BY TARA AUSTEN WEAVERPHOTOS BY PAOLA THOMAS Like many parents, Vicky and Tom Brown worried about their daughter as she headed into the teen years. Their main concern: boys. Their solution to the problem, however, might surprise you. They got her a goat. “We were really just trying to distract her,” says Vicky. The animal was a Future Farmers of America project, housed at a farm near their home in San Diego. Every day after work Vicky took her daughter Christine to the farm, and waited while she did her goat chores. “I was working as a CFO at the time and I would show up in my Nordstrom clothes,” Vicky laughs....

Skagit Malting

Skagit Malting is poised to change craft beer making...

Mastering the Art of Breakfast

the unexpected evolution of Marge Granola BY TARA AUSTEN WEAVER Megan Gordon never intended to start a granola company. In the early months of 2010, she was writing a business plan for a bakery and dreaming up pie recipes. Granola was the furthest thing from her mind. “I was an English teacher in California and had been laid-off,” she explains. To tide herself over, she started working in the catering division of a local restaurant. “Our offices were above the bakery and I got very little done,” Gordon admits. “I was always peering in, talking to the bakers.” Eventually they let her pick up a Sunday baking shift. “I just loved it,” Gordon remembers, “the pace, and the act of feeding people in the...

urban-foraging-jan-feb2014

Urban Foraging Jan/Feb2014 It may be hard to get out of bed this time of year, but the recipes in Whole-Grain Mornings serve as tempting enticement. Seattleite Megan Gordon owns a granola company, but her enthusiasm for breakfast does not stop at oats and almonds. Her cookbook is enough to make the grumpiest of us reconsider mornings—recipes like Triple-Coconut Quinoa Porridge, Saucy Tomato Poached Eggs with Wheat Berries and Kale and grab-and-go options like Nutty Millet Breakfast Cookies and Peanut Butter Crispy Brown Rice Bars. Each seasonal section is divided into recipes that range from busy weekday mornings to more elaborate brunch dishes (consider: Smoked Salmon Crème Fraiche Tart with Cornmeal-Millet Crust). Along with breakfast, this book will give you...

The Feast That Makes A Family

BY TAMIKO NIMURA There’s gravel crackling under our car wheels as we drive up my Auntie Nesan’s driveway. After we come to a stop, my husband Josh and I unbuckle our two little girls out of the backseat. We walk up to the house, trailing blankets and stuffed animals, and I tap on the screen door. “Happy New Year! Come in!” my eighty-something aunt answers cheerily. After hugs and exclamations (“the girls are getting so big!”), we ask if we can bring anything over to Auntie Sadako’s house, about a hundred feet away. We leave carrying a platter of barbecued teriyaki chicken and a bowl of ambrosia fruit salad, walking a path worn smooth by the tread of my aunts and uncles and...

Quinoa Crunch

4 servings | 30 minutes If you’ve never considered making your own granola, Megan says this quick Quinoa Crunch is an easy entrée into the genre. It’s a great topping for yogurt, or a tasty snack on its own. Rinse the quinoa and dry completely on a kitchen towel before starting the recipe. 1 cup raw quinoa, rinsed and drained well 1/2 cup sliced raw almonds 3 tablespoons raw sesame seeds 1 tablespoon maple syrup 1 tablespoon safflower or canola oil Preheat the oven to 375°F. Line a baking sheet with parchment paper or a silicone mat. Mix all the ingredients and spread on the prepared baking sheet. Bake until toasty and fragrant, 10 to 12 minutes. Transfer to a bowl and let cool completely. Store in...