Holiday Break

There is plenty of hustle and bustle to go around this time of year: holiday parties and big family gatherings, concerts, school pageants, and New Year’s Eve celebrations. In the midst of all that busyness, it doesn’t hurt to schedule an evening with a few friends for a casual meal that gives you a chance to catch up over good food and revive a bit around the table together. You owe it to yourself....

A Day in the Life

in a small church basement, stereotypes are shattered and people are fed...

Norwegian Christmas Cookies

“Each pastry has its own unique form,” writes Stokker, “something that adds to the challenge of making them.”...

Grain Country Spirits

With wheat growing in their front yard, a new crop of distillers is making their mark on eastern Washington....

Of Land and Sea

On Lopez Island, diversity is the key for Jones Family Farm...

A Pacific Northwest Christmas Cake

I have lived in the U.S. long enough to know that fruitcake here is much maligned— dry as a bone and hard as masonry nails—something few people in their right mind would consider eating....

A Taste for Bitter

Bitter may be America’s least liked flavor, but McLagan makes a persuasive argument that this should change—and that a change may already be underway....

Pie Salad

My mother is a nutrition nut, so when it was time for me to go to preschool her problem wasn’t vaccinations, it was dessert. She knew my education would coincide with an introduction to real cookies and I’d never look at fruit with the same delight again....

Sol to Seed Farm

“I went out there and thought it was amazing,’” Matt says. “Even when I was just doing something mundane.”...

It Takes an Island

at Lopez Island Vineyards, community-supported viniculture happens each fall...

In the Herb Garden

Growing food at home can seem an unrealistic goal to those of us not born with a green thumb. But this only makes the joys of home-grown herbs that much more powerful, since they’re among the most easy-going edibles we can cultivate. ...

A Farmer by Any Other Name

Rand Rasheed rises at the crack of dawn every morning. A ten-minute drive later and she’s in the field, checking on the eight acres of sandy Snohomish Valley soil she manages with the help of a business partner and a few apprentices....

Brightening the Spirit

For all the mystery surrounding kombucha, Joyner says it’s “refreshing and lifts your spirits,” and that seems to be more than enough to keep him going for another 25 years....

Girl Meets Dirt

on Orcas Island, Audra Lawlor is preserving agricultural heritage and putting down roots...

The Wide World of Yogurt

These days fermentation is all the rage—kombucha can be bought in corner stores, pickles are hipper than they have ever been, and yogurt has taken over the dairy case....

The Northwest Tea Festival

“Tea is the second most popular beverage in the world,” points out Rosanoff [the first being water]. “It’s changed and adapted to different cultures and that’s what is fun about it—to see Korean tea ceremony and Japanese tea ceremony next to each other.”...

Sweetness Follows

Our mom taught herself to fry jelly doughnuts in her big Dutch oven when she discovered how much Dad relished them. Among my earliest kitchen memories is the merry, sandy sound of her shaking hot doughnuts with sugar in a brown paper bag. Our life burst with sweetness....

Food Chains

About five years ago we joined the ranks of backyard chicken farmers in Seattle....

Growing Veterans

in Whatcom County a unique program sows the seeds of community...

Sky-High Honey

chef Gavin Stephenson takes beekeeping to new heights at the Fairmont Olympic...

Grilled Greek Feast

Greek food lends itself to the outdoors, whether it’s a camping adventure or a cookout at Golden Gardens....

Hopvines and Bloodlines

Yakima’s Bale Breaker Brewing Company is the newest chapter for an old hops-farming family...

From Farm to Photo

the playful patterns of Brittany Wright are catching eyes everywhere...

Plum, Chocolate, Hazelnut

One of the greatest joys of high summer in Seattle is the triumphal seasonal progress of stone fruits through the farmers’ markets....

Shrubs

It’s the season of fruit abundance— and no one is complaining—but sometimes the berries pile up....

EDITOR’S LETTER JULY/AUGUST 2015

Travel is an astounding thing. It teaches you about the place you are visiting, but it also teaches you about the place you are from....

An Act of Faith

At the end of the day, gardening is an act of faith. We tuck tender seedlings into the earth and water them well, we tend and weed and watch over, all in the hope that the summer day will come, the sunny one, when we will pluck those tomatoes off the vine and eat them....

Capitol Market

visitors flock to Olympia for one of the oldest farmers’ markets in the state...

The Female Farmer Project

Audra Mulkern never set out to chronicle a movement; she just wanted to take pictures of the produce at her local farmers’ markets in the Snoqualmie Valley. When she posted them to Facebook, however, friends asked if they could buy cards with the images. She didn’t know it then, but that’s where it all began to change....

Brunch Keepers

There’s nothing like a special brunch—whether it be for Mother’s Day, Father’s Day, Your Best Friend’s Day, or Your Own Dang Day....

A Special Treat

Sunlight pours through the corner windows, hitting the Marie Antoinette-worthy crystal chandelier hanging over the pastry case and scattering rainbows across the room....

Practical Permaculture

It’s easy to think of permaculture as a sustainable lifestyle, but it’s really based on ethics— and it applies to much more than just gardening....

May/June 2015 Letter from the Editor

I first met Rachael Coyle when she became the culinary director at Book Larder, Seattle’s community cookbook store in upper Fremont....

Sorghum: The Versatile Grain You’ll Fall For

In our kitchen, the cooler months beg for pantry items that are versatile. I often find myself hunkering down a bit more than usual in the winter, as many of us do in Seattle, relying on old standbys like soups and stews, homemade bread, and roasted vegetables....

A Korean Table

In culinary school, my cooking partner was of Korean descent. In one of our assignments, we were supposed to write a fine-dining, multi-course Korean menu. My friend politely pointed out that true Korean dinners would not include several courses. Rather, a Korean fine-dining experience would mean even more dishes and banchan (side dishes), arranged at the table all at once, in a lavish display of abundance....

A Wide World of Spice

Anyone who sticks their head in the doorway of World Spice Merchants, on Western Avenue below Pike Place Market, can’t help but be intrigued....

The Ruby Red Lure

Growing up, I never paid much attention to rhubarb. I thought it was something from another era—the Victorian one, perhaps—served alongside dishes like syllabub and blancmange....

Helsing Junction Farm

The mission is simple: grow the most beneficial food possible — food that is integral to a healthy farming system, good for human health, full of flavor, and available to a wide range of people. Since Ujcic (pronounced you-jick) and Salafsky founded Helsing Junction in 1992 it has grown from five farmed acres to almost a hundred, and from 75 community supported agriculture (CSA) subscribers to more than a thousand, spanning from Lynnwood to Portland and out to the coast....

A Weird that Wows

In the kitchen—and the imagination—of Gastropod’s Travis Kukull...

Reinventing the Beer Wheel

Jason Yerger started brewing beer out of desperation. When he was diagnosed with a gluten intolerance in 2007, the craft beer lover struggled to find anything on the market worth drinking....

Life at the Table

Ashley Rodriguez expected to fall in love with Italy. As an art student at Seattle Pacific University, she signed up to study abroad hoping to revel in a country steeped in art history. But it was the culture’s gastronomic influence—the gelato, the carbonara, the conversation, and long meals—that left a lasting mark. There was “something magic” that happened around the table in Italy....

Letter from the Editor

I never planned to become a gardener—but I never planned to move to Seattle either....

Eating Clean

The darkest part of winter lends itself to all kinds of life reflections. How are my goals, my relationships, my health? Even without resolutions, the urge to think about the future feels strong in quiet January....

Bites and Beers in Bellingham

I know locals who complain that Bellingham can’t keep an upscale restaurant alive. At one time there were several fine dining destinations, like Nimbus, Flats and Tivoli. In recent years those businesses have dwindled and in their place has come a Portland-like plethora of brewpubs, sandwich shops, and food trucks that seems to fit the town's casual approach....

Black Sheep Creamery

Early afternoon sunlight bounces off the white walls of the cheesemaking room at Black Sheep Creamery, making stacks of plastic buckets and the painted white cheese press glow....

Making Big Gin

Tucked away in a quiet corner of Ballard, Captive Spirits is one of a growing number of producers in the Northwest focused on spirits....

Sweet Dreams and Chocolate Cake

In Hot Cakes’ Ballard kitchen, the day starts and ends with cookies—salted peanut butter, s’mores, snickerdoodles, and perhaps the city’s best chocolate chip....

Juicing Up a Business

An attempt at healthful eating transformed two chefs’ careers...

Native Harvest

Connecting the tribal catch with local chefs and restaurants...

Jan/Feb 2015 Editor’s Letter

The first article I wrote for Edible Seattle took me to Stanwood, Washington, on a grey day in January—a time of year on farms in this region that can most accurately be described as the season of mud....