Hop to it!

A candy-maker infuses Yakima Valley hops into lollipops to make her signature LolliHops...

Eating Between the Pages

A reporter asked author Donna Leon about her crime series' protagonist, Commissario Guido Brunetti, a Venetian police inspector. “Did you give him a love of food so you could write about it?”...

Growing with Community

Central Co-op’s commitment to small producers and ethical sourcing makes it more than your average grocery store....

Inaugural Autumn

Here are a few quick and easy weeknight dinners that can be made in 40 minutes or less and require very little hands-on time. Best yet: The leftovers are easily packable and make for tasty lunches during the workweek. ...

Quick Braised Lentils with Blistered Tomatoes and Kale

The last of summer tomatoes enliven this dish and, when blistered, add sweetness and brightness. Fall kale is plentiful this time of year, and pairs well with earthy lentils and crumbled goat cheese. To save time with this recipe, buy pre-cooked lentils, which can be found at many upscale markets....

Quick Chickpea Biryani

Biryani is a fragrant and flavorful rice dish hailing from India, and varies greatly from region to region. This version is vegan and features chickpeas as the protein, minimizing the cooking time significantly....

Roasted Cauliflower Pasta with Parsley and Toasted Walnuts

Together with the toasted walnuts, this fall inspired dish boasts more cauliflower than actual pasta, making it a healthy, veggie-forward meal. Feel free to substitute or include other vegetables like roasted broccoli, peppers, or root vegetables to the mix....

Chefs Who Farm

A handful of top Western Washington chefs plant a new spin on farm-to-table dining — by doing some of the farming themselves....

Tannat

The Tannat grape originated in southwestern France, has become a favorite of winemakers in Uruguay, and is now taking hold in the Pacific Northwest....

Lentil Salad with Roasted Carrots and Labneh

The earthy taste of lentils goes perfectly with the earthiness of root vegetables. Carrots, roasted to a caramel sweetness, seem to be a particularly felicitous match....

Prawn Dhansak

The red lentils in this dish cook down to a mush, though you could add more robust lentils for a bit of a bite. Anglo-Indian restaurants often use canned pineapple to add sweetness, but butternut squash or pumpkin is more usual in Indian recipes, and it lends an extra creamy texture and a less aggressive sweetness to the lentils....

Italian Tomato, Lentil, and Bacon Soup

I couldn’t get enough of this soup the first time my Italian zia lifted a big pot of it from her stove, and it is still one of my family’s favorite suppers — rich, filling, and tasty enough to satisfy the heartiest of appetites and, if served with a loaf of crusty bread, the perfect one-pot meal for when the nights start drawing in....

Lentils

A staple in so many other parts of the world — lentils are bursting with nutrients, rich in protein, packed with fiber and slow-release carbs, incredibly versatile, and cheap to boot....

Back to That Dirt

Lesedi Farm germinated in the dirt of central Botswana and now bears fruit in the soil of Whidbey Island....

Taking the Bait

“They’re the Rodney Dangerfield of the sea,” says Warner Lew, Seattle’s herring evangelist and seller of high-end canned and smoked fish. “No one wants it; no one eats it. And I just think it could have a better fate.”...

Chilled Shrimp Salad

This flavorful recipe is from Mike Whisenhunt, chef at Brimmer & Heeltap....

Open to Interpretation

Brimmer & Heeltap chef Mike Whisenhunt uses familiar flavors as a springboard into the unknown....

As the Season Turns, Savoring Spelt

As we dip our toes into the waters of this new season, I think you just may find that spelt is a great excuse to crack open the window and let in some of that cool autumn breeze while preheating the oven. The best of both worlds, no?...

Spelt Berry Salad with Honey-Thyme Apples and Pecans

A colorful, flavor-packed salad boasting all the best this season has to offer, this is a great fall picnic or potluck candidate. If you can remember, soak the spelt berries overnight to speed up cook time; if you forget, you’ll simply want to let them cook an additional 15–20 minutes, until tender....

Sheet Pan Harissa Chicken and Sweet Potatoes

This dish takes just 10 minutes of hands-on time before going into the oven to bake. Mildly spicy and smoky, the quick harissa marinade is easy and simple — just stir it up in a bowl....

The Easy Island

“You’re not afraid of heights, right?” my guide asks me as I walk up to the edge of the zipline platform and try not to look down at the swirl of leaves and earth far below my feet. I am, in fact, quite terrified of heights, but, hey, life is short....

Pumpkin Spelt Loaf with Pepita Streusel

Whole-grain loaves can often be sturdy and squatty, but this fall beauty is almost stately in stature, with a light crumb and subtle kiss of spice. While I love grinding down pepitas to use in the batter, you can certainly use almond or hazelnut meal if you prefer....

Midsummer Italian Feast

Have you ever wondered why food in far-off places like Tuscany or Provence tastes so much better than at home? More often than not, it’s because dishes are prepared with locally grown ingredients...

From Farm to Freezer

What started as a simple summer treat for Mandolyn Hume’s children is now a thriving business....

When Life Gives You Lemon Balm…

Don’t despair if your yard is overrun with lemon balm at this time of year. Instead, grab big handfuls and make a delicious lemon balm simple syrup...

Beyond the Bean

That foamy-white cappuccino – your sunshine in a cup – has a dark side. What you don’t see are the neck-deep piles of discarded coffee-cherry pulp rotting in the tropical heat, producing greenhouse gases and serving as breeding grounds for disease-borne mosquitoes. A former Starbucks employee named Dan Belliveau is out to change all of that....

Eating in the Moment

When Dustin Ronspies talks — let alone laughs — the sound comes from a deep place. From his diaphragm, of course, but also from his history, which is as nonlinear and unconventional as the chef himself....

Grow Epic Tomatoes

Bill Thorness stakes out the best way to cultivate your growing treasures....

Palencia Albariño

White wines are extremely intimidating to a winemaker. The flaws are so easy to detect. They’re very unforgiving. I build myself up for harvest every year, mentally and emotionally....

Witches’ Brew

Walking into the apothecary, I pass by rows of dried herbs in tall glass jars, a tiered display of small, hand-woven nests, window shelves filled with shiny, colorful crystal gems, and a display of animal bones and antlers. It feels as though I’ve stepped into a voodoo shop....

Rustic Rosemary Cornmeal Tart with Wild Blackberries

The recipe has grown up with me and reflects my fondness for herbs with sweets and my propensity to add the crunchy, nuttiness of cornmeal everywhere I can! Make one big tart or individual galettes, and serve warm with vanilla bean ice cream for dessert. If there are leftovers, have a second slice for breakfast with coffee....

Summer Jewels: Blackberries

Overripe wild blackberries, warm with the sun — preferably whiffed from a hiking trail or the saddle of a bike — are the smell of summer in the Pacific Northwest....

A Drop in the Ocean

St. Jude Tuna has been the work and livelihood of Joe and Joyce Malley since they began marketing it in Seattle around 2000....

Halibut with Summer Vegetables, Dashi & Curry Oil

You can’t go wrong with a bowl of fresh halibut and summer vegetables in a light dashi broth. Dustin Ronspies (Art of the Table) recommends pairing this dish with a dry Riesling from Wichmann Dundee Estate in Willamette Valley, Oregon....

The First Cookie

A couple of years ago, my husband, Andy, received a package in the mail from his father: a small plastic box containing a collection of family recipe cards....

Lunch and Learn

Ethnic Seattle’s food tour helps bridge the gap between Little Saigon’s restaurants and first-time patrons — bringing these hidden gems into a well-deserved spotlight....

Strawberry and Lemon Balm Drizzle Cake

Lemon balm has long been used for medicinal purposes — hence the name — so this cake is practically health food. That’s my story anyway....

Straight-up Strawberry Ice Pops

Fannie’s Ice Pops makes “fun on a stick” — frozen summertime treats that are vegan, gluten-free, all natural, and feature local, organic ingredients whenever possible....

Farm to Fork on Lopez Island

A farm stay in the San Juan Islands yields a deeper appreciation for the care that goes into raising your food....

A Scape Education

Garlic didn’t get much attention in our house when I was growing up. When I moved to Seattle after college, I learned the word allium, the family of onions and garlic....

Mint Perfect!

Mint. It grows like a weed around these parts and we might sometimes take its ubiquity for granted. Yet there is no easier way to conjure up a burst of summer sunshine than by throwing a handful of zingy, fresh mint into a dish....

Growing a Legacy

A farmer honors the legacies of his parents — one from the farm and the other from Pike Place Market....

Makings of a Renaissance

Jason Stratton pulls a page from an enlightened past to celebrate and savor the short spurt of spring....

Grow Up!

Grow your cucumbers and squash up an A-frame trellis, send peas up a temporary wall, try beans on a tunnel or a teepee, and, of course, corral your tomatoes in sturdy cages. Think intensively grown veggies on apartment-building decks and rooftops....

Taking Root

Timber City Ginger Beer taps into local seasonal tastes to create zingy drinks with a Northwest twist....

Only Serving Love

Operation Sack Lunch rescues food that would otherwise be tossed, and creates nourishing meals for the city’s most vulnerable citizens....

Summer arrives with apricots

Apricots are one of my favorite early-summer stone fruits. I love pulling them apart at the seams and taking big, juicy bites as the soft, orange skin brushes my lips, the sourness clings to the back of my throat, and the syrupy fruit quenches my thirst....

Taking a Bite Out of Global Warming

With the arrival of 2017, I began to rethink what this moment needs from us. What we eat leaves ample room for change, the kind that immediately improves the air we breathe, the water we drink, and the land we call home....

Strawberry Elderflower Tiramisu

This flowery, fruity dessert can be made ahead and stored in the fridge. It features fresh local strawberries....

A May Day Dinner Party

With the arrival of spring, cheerful, fragrant blossoms fill the air, and colorful, vibrant produce can be found in abundance at our local farmers markets....

Tempranillo Thrives Under the Radar

It's not Cabernet, Sauvignon, Merlot, or Syrah. It's something different, something new, yet something that doesn't assault wine drinkers with its "otherness."...

Blueberry Mint Swirl Popsicles

Summer isn’t summer without popsicles. This recipe is a riff off the classic mojito combination of mint, lime, and brown sugar....

Thai-Style Crab, Mushroom, and Pumpkin Curry

Adding fresh Thai herbs to commercial curry paste and canned coconut milk really lifts this dish to another level, while the inclusion of sweet pumpkin and earthy mushrooms makes this dish rich and satisfying enough for the darkest winter evening....

Winter Crab Salad with Orange Miso Dressing

Eating salad in January can seem a bit of a chore, but this zesty winter salad is packed with more than enough flavor to enliven even those tastebuds dulled by a surfeit of cookies and eggnog....

Plant Perennials For the Garden that Keeps on Giving

It is surely the biggest flower that you’ll ever eat, and the only one with a heart. But if you’re not careful, its spiky petals can prick your fingers. This mystery vegetable is, of course, the artichoke, and it’s one of more than a dozen perennial vegetables that can be easily grown to provide food year after year with much less care than anything coming out of your annual vegetable patch....

Romancing the Grain

Greg Moring is on his fourth career, but you’d never know it. From the way he bakes bread, you’d think he’d been doing it his entire life. I meet him at his bakery space in Ballard, greeted by the smell of cinnamon and other spices....

Tomato Starts and Traditions

I possess a solid resume of struggling houseplants and moldering windowsill herb pots − I could give a sideways glance to a dandelion and kill it. And here I live, in the bountiful Pacific Northwest, where anyone with a scrap of soil has a Pinterest-perfect garden. When we got our first house with a big backyard, it wasn’t peer pressure or aspirational living that got me curious about gardening. Instead, it was the voice of my dearly departed grandmother with her no-nonsense attitude: “You don’t know until you try, so get out there and get your hands dirty.”...

Helpings of Knowledge

“We want to make healthy food more accessible by breaking it down into simple concepts that you can take home to your kitchen,” says Cooking Matters Program Coordinator Nicole Dufva...

New World, Old Ways

Few foods so perfectly encapsulate the flavor of summer like sweet corn. Whether shaved off the cob into succotash, roasted over hot coals for elotes, or simply shucked, boiled, and twirled atop a sacrificial butter cube anointed with a little salt, when you eat corn, you’re participating in a New World tradition that’s many millennia old....

Where the Wild Things Are

Winemaking is a tightly controlled scientific process. Every aspect — the rate of fermentation, temperature, chemical content, nutrients — is monitored from the first day grapes are crushed to the day you pour a glass of delicious Cabernet....

Farm to Tea Cup

Tirza Wibel works in a well-lighted place, gently turning over tea leaves in a wide-mouthed stainless steel bowl. She works the mixture by hand, tenderly incorporating dark shards of Earl Grey with dried, amber-hued orange peels and cornflower petals colored like chips of sea glass....

When the Tide Goes Out, the Table is Set

Kurt Grinnell clips a winch onto a metal box submerged on a platform at the end of a dock on Sequim Bay’s John Wayne Marina. As he raises the box, countless tiny oysters become visible. Grinnell dips a hand in, cradling a few dozen. These half-inch babies look just like their larger counterparts: blue-gray shells tipped with gold. Soon, they’ll be placed on a beach to grow big enough to shuck and slurp....

West Coast Gold

“This is West Coast gold,” Phil Allen says gleefully as he plops a Dungeness crab the size of a dinner plate into a five-gallon bucket. We’re perched on a shoulder of boulders that comprise the North Jetty of the Columbia River’s vast mouth, where it thrashes into the Pacific Ocean at Cape Disappointment....

Spring Brunch

Gradually, our days begin to lengthen. Young leaves unfurl in the warmth, and blossoms begin their glorious show. It feels as if the world has come alive, all sparkling and new. Mornings are especially effervescent with this vibrant energy, and I can't think of better way to celebrate this magical time of year than with friends and family gathered around the table for a spring brunch....

Black Bean and Beet Burgers

When you grate beets and mix them with black beans, something interesting happens: the mixture looks a whole lot like raw hamburger. Grated cheese is tucked inside the patties, “Juicy Lucy” style. While the patties cook, the cheese oozes from the inside out and forms a savory crust....

Emerald Forest Cake

At this time of year, a trip to the farmers market yields slim pickings for the seasonal cake baker, and for a time, this seasonal cake-recipe writer was similarly lacking in inspiration, until I turned my attention to all the wonderful local products in our store cupboards and freezers. As thoughts of hand-crafted chocolate and succulent frozen cherries came to mind, I started mulling a Pacific Northwest version of a traditional Black Forest Cake. After some local and seasonal substitutions, the result was a take on the cake that might be better than the original....

Grapefruit & Fennel Salad

A simple, refreshing salad with bright zesty flavors. Juicy grapefruit and crunchy shaved fennel are arranged overtop a bed of vibrant butter lettuce....

French Toast Muffins

Serve these pretty French toast muffins as a starter, as part of the main course, or as a sweet ending to your special gathering. They are easy to make and can be made with most any fresh berry. Assemble before your guests arrive, and place them in the oven to bake right as the guests walk in the door....

Strawberry Chamomile Bellini

As your guests arrive, hand them a refreshing champagne cocktail, made with fresh strawberries and a whisper of chamomile, the perfect starter to your spring gathering....

Proven Pearings

I speak from experience when I say that a pastry chef’s palette of seasonal ingredients is crowded with caramel and chocolate browns when winter rolls around. But if you look closely, there are plenty of local options for satisfying your sweet tooth. From the sweet, creamy yellow flesh of a Seckel pear, to the papery mahogany skin of the hazelnut, to the deep, dark brown of extra-dark, bittersweet chocolate, what winter’s offerings lack in bright color and flavor are made up for in richness and texture....

Caramel-Poached Pears with Chocolate Caramel Cream and Toasted Hazelnut Sables

The flavors, temperatures, and textures of this dessert demand the diner’s attention: buttery, melt-in-your-mouth cookies with crunchy edges; sweetly yielding, slightly warm caramelized pears; and frozen chocolate cream, light as a cloud. Each of the components is quite straightforward and comes together easily....

Seeding is Believing

I am restless behind my windows, and the garden beckons. But January always offers up slate-gray mornings and frosty nights, and though the winter solstice is behind us, I feel boxed in by these short days. As I gaze out at my streetlight-lit garden in the endless eventide, I decide that the only antidote is an armchair getaway. In a time like this, gardening catalogically has to suffice....

No Manual Required

I have always maintained that if you want to get to know someone infinitely better, all you need to do is meet their parents. This year, I’ve learned that you can gauge how someone feels about their parents by telling them that yours are building a house in your backyard. From the beginning, it was always the three of us: my mothers and me. I was raised by two delightfully stubborn women who have never let anyone determine their fate, whether that meant having a baby as a lesbian couple in 1984, opening Seattle’s first woman-owned coffee roastery, or countless other quietly subversive actions that have enabled our family to thrive. ...

Percolating Through the Generations

It was the late 1800s. In the midst of the internal violence of Colombia’s Thousand Days’ War, a group of daring muleteers, or arrieros, ventured south from Manizales to seek their fortunes in the unexplored lands bordered by modern-day Caldas, Risaralda, and Quindío: the fertile triangle of Colombia’s famous La Zona Cafetera — The Coffee Zone....

Defying Categorization

Plums. Apricots. Dehydrated limes. Dandelion greens. Rose hips. At Urban Family Brewing in Interbay, a wild array of ingredients make their way into the off-beat beers that are continually rotating through the taps....

Old Wines, New World

Tanjuli Winery nestles into the Rattlesnake Hills, just above the tiny town of Zillah in eastern Washington. The landscape here is rich — acres of fruit trees roll into rows of wine grapes, with farmstead homes scattered among them. Winemaker Tom Campbell and I pick our way across the graveled paths between vineyard blocks. I see globes of heavy, dark grapes on the vines ahead of us....

Always Growing

It’s a glorious late-September day on the slopes of Grandview in Washington’s beautiful Yakima Valley. A bright blue sky is streaked with wisps of cloud. Mount Adams and Mount Rainier gleam in the distance, and the hills all around are snuggled under a striped quilt of vineyards and orchards....

One Ingredient Three Ways: Dungeness Crab

The delicate but distinctive flavor of the Pacific Northwest's Dungeness crab combines winter's reality with summer's promise, making a perfect New Year's resolution....

Collins Family Orchard

Calvin Collins sports a Seattle Seahawks cap, and his hands are covered in a hard day’s work. He’s been up since five in the morning, caring for his trees, boxing fruit, and loading a large truck to take the produce to the orchard’s warehouse in Magnolia, where it will be stored in a cold room before going out for sale at farmers markets throughout the city....

Korean Short Rib Bibimbap with Rachel Yang

“If you are going to break the rules, you better know the rules,” says Rachel Yang, chef owner of Joule, Revel, and Trove restaurants. Rachel and her husband, Seif Chirchi, have risen in Seattle’s culinary scene by, among many things, honoring authentic cuisine through reinvention....

Early to Rise

Before sunrise, nearly every day, brothers Kit and Jesse Schumann are at their new Stone Way bakery, Sea Wolf, elbow-deep in flour. Such is life when you’re a two-person bakery – and a popular one at that. The Schumanns' venture is barely three years old, but it has a cult following, with a legion of fans built by exposure in some of Seattle’s best restaurants....

Beer & Bivalves

A scant 10 minutes after stepping out of my car in Olympia, I’m already slurping raw oysters. My first stop on a road trip to Washington’s state capital is the Olympia Farmers Market, a year-round affair that bustles with shoppers selecting fresh produce, locally-raised meat, cut flowers, artisanal goods, and local crafts, against a backdrop of live music. The air at the market, situated about a block away from Puget Sound, smells deeply of seaweed and salt — rather like oysters....