As the Season Turns, Savoring Spelt

As we dip our toes into the waters of this new season, I think you just may find that spelt is a great excuse to crack open the window and let in some of that cool autumn breeze while preheating the oven. The best of both worlds, no?...

The Easy Island

“You’re not afraid of heights, right?” my guide asks me as I walk up to the edge of the zipline platform and try not to look down at the swirl of leaves and earth far below my feet. I am, in fact, quite terrified of heights, but, hey, life is short....

Midsummer Italian Feast

Have you ever wondered why food in far-off places like Tuscany or Provence tastes so much better than at home? More often than not, it’s because dishes are prepared with locally grown ingredients...

From Farm to Freezer

What started as a simple summer treat for Mandolyn Hume’s children is now a thriving business....

When Life Gives You Lemon Balm…

Don’t despair if your yard is overrun with lemon balm at this time of year. Instead, grab big handfuls and make a delicious lemon balm simple syrup...

Beyond the Bean

That foamy-white cappuccino – your sunshine in a cup – has a dark side. What you don’t see are the neck-deep piles of discarded coffee-cherry pulp rotting in the tropical heat, producing greenhouse gases and serving as breeding grounds for disease-borne mosquitoes. A former Starbucks employee named Dan Belliveau is out to change all of that....

Eating in the Moment

When Dustin Ronspies talks — let alone laughs — the sound comes from a deep place. From his diaphragm, of course, but also from his history, which is as nonlinear and unconventional as the chef himself....

Grow Epic Tomatoes

Bill Thorness stakes out the best way to cultivate your growing treasures....

Palencia Albariño

White wines are extremely intimidating to a winemaker. The flaws are so easy to detect. They’re very unforgiving. I build myself up for harvest every year, mentally and emotionally....

Witches’ Brew

Walking into the apothecary, I pass by rows of dried herbs in tall glass jars, a tiered display of small, hand-woven nests, window shelves filled with shiny, colorful crystal gems, and a display of animal bones and antlers. It feels as though I’ve stepped into a voodoo shop....

Summer Jewels: Blackberries

Overripe wild blackberries, warm with the sun — preferably whiffed from a hiking trail or the saddle of a bike — are the smell of summer in the Pacific Northwest....

A Drop in the Ocean

St. Jude Tuna has been the work and livelihood of Joe and Joyce Malley since they began marketing it in Seattle around 2000....

The First Cookie

A couple of years ago, my husband, Andy, received a package in the mail from his father: a small plastic box containing a collection of family recipe cards....

Lunch and Learn

Ethnic Seattle’s food tour helps bridge the gap between Little Saigon’s restaurants and first-time patrons — bringing these hidden gems into a well-deserved spotlight....

Farm to Fork on Lopez Island

A farm stay in the San Juan Islands yields a deeper appreciation for the care that goes into raising your food....

A Scape Education

Garlic didn’t get much attention in our house when I was growing up. When I moved to Seattle after college, I learned the word allium, the family of onions and garlic....

Mint Perfect!

Mint. It grows like a weed around these parts and we might sometimes take its ubiquity for granted. Yet there is no easier way to conjure up a burst of summer sunshine than by throwing a handful of zingy, fresh mint into a dish....

Growing a Legacy

A farmer honors the legacies of his parents — one from the farm and the other from Pike Place Market....

Makings of a Renaissance

Jason Stratton pulls a page from an enlightened past to celebrate and savor the short spurt of spring....

Grow Up!

Grow your cucumbers and squash up an A-frame trellis, send peas up a temporary wall, try beans on a tunnel or a teepee, and, of course, corral your tomatoes in sturdy cages. Think intensively grown veggies on apartment-building decks and rooftops....

Taking Root

Timber City Ginger Beer taps into local seasonal tastes to create zingy drinks with a Northwest twist....

Only Serving Love

Operation Sack Lunch rescues food that would otherwise be tossed, and creates nourishing meals for the city’s most vulnerable citizens....

Summer arrives with apricots

Apricots are one of my favorite early-summer stone fruits. I love pulling them apart at the seams and taking big, juicy bites as the soft, orange skin brushes my lips, the sourness clings to the back of my throat, and the syrupy fruit quenches my thirst....

Taking a Bite Out of Global Warming

With the arrival of 2017, I began to rethink what this moment needs from us. What we eat leaves ample room for change, the kind that immediately improves the air we breathe, the water we drink, and the land we call home....

A May Day Dinner Party

With the arrival of spring, cheerful, fragrant blossoms fill the air, and colorful, vibrant produce can be found in abundance at our local farmers markets....

Tempranillo Thrives Under the Radar

It's not Cabernet, Sauvignon, Merlot, or Syrah. It's something different, something new, yet something that doesn't assault wine drinkers with its "otherness."...

Plant Perennials For the Garden that Keeps on Giving

It is surely the biggest flower that you’ll ever eat, and the only one with a heart. But if you’re not careful, its spiky petals can prick your fingers. This mystery vegetable is, of course, the artichoke, and it’s one of more than a dozen perennial vegetables that can be easily grown to provide food year after year with much less care than anything coming out of your annual vegetable patch....

Romancing the Grain

Greg Moring is on his fourth career, but you’d never know it. From the way he bakes bread, you’d think he’d been doing it his entire life. I meet him at his bakery space in Ballard, greeted by the smell of cinnamon and other spices....

Tomato Starts and Traditions

I possess a solid resume of struggling houseplants and moldering windowsill herb pots − I could give a sideways glance to a dandelion and kill it. And here I live, in the bountiful Pacific Northwest, where anyone with a scrap of soil has a Pinterest-perfect garden. When we got our first house with a big backyard, it wasn’t peer pressure or aspirational living that got me curious about gardening. Instead, it was the voice of my dearly departed grandmother with her no-nonsense attitude: “You don’t know until you try, so get out there and get your hands dirty.”...

Helpings of Knowledge

“We want to make healthy food more accessible by breaking it down into simple concepts that you can take home to your kitchen,” says Cooking Matters Program Coordinator Nicole Dufva...

New World, Old Ways

Few foods so perfectly encapsulate the flavor of summer like sweet corn. Whether shaved off the cob into succotash, roasted over hot coals for elotes, or simply shucked, boiled, and twirled atop a sacrificial butter cube anointed with a little salt, when you eat corn, you’re participating in a New World tradition that’s many millennia old....

Where the Wild Things Are

Winemaking is a tightly controlled scientific process. Every aspect — the rate of fermentation, temperature, chemical content, nutrients — is monitored from the first day grapes are crushed to the day you pour a glass of delicious Cabernet....

Farm to Tea Cup

Tirza Wibel works in a well-lighted place, gently turning over tea leaves in a wide-mouthed stainless steel bowl. She works the mixture by hand, tenderly incorporating dark shards of Earl Grey with dried, amber-hued orange peels and cornflower petals colored like chips of sea glass....

When the Tide Goes Out, the Table is Set

Kurt Grinnell clips a winch onto a metal box submerged on a platform at the end of a dock on Sequim Bay’s John Wayne Marina. As he raises the box, countless tiny oysters become visible. Grinnell dips a hand in, cradling a few dozen. These half-inch babies look just like their larger counterparts: blue-gray shells tipped with gold. Soon, they’ll be placed on a beach to grow big enough to shuck and slurp....

West Coast Gold

“This is West Coast gold,” Phil Allen says gleefully as he plops a Dungeness crab the size of a dinner plate into a five-gallon bucket. We’re perched on a shoulder of boulders that comprise the North Jetty of the Columbia River’s vast mouth, where it thrashes into the Pacific Ocean at Cape Disappointment....

Spring Brunch

Gradually, our days begin to lengthen. Young leaves unfurl in the warmth, and blossoms begin their glorious show. It feels as if the world has come alive, all sparkling and new. Mornings are especially effervescent with this vibrant energy, and I can't think of better way to celebrate this magical time of year than with friends and family gathered around the table for a spring brunch....

Emerald Forest Cake

At this time of year, a trip to the farmers market yields slim pickings for the seasonal cake baker, and for a time, this seasonal cake-recipe writer was similarly lacking in inspiration, until I turned my attention to all the wonderful local products in our store cupboards and freezers. As thoughts of hand-crafted chocolate and succulent frozen cherries came to mind, I started mulling a Pacific Northwest version of a traditional Black Forest Cake. After some local and seasonal substitutions, the result was a take on the cake that might be better than the original....

Proven Pearings

I speak from experience when I say that a pastry chef’s palette of seasonal ingredients is crowded with caramel and chocolate browns when winter rolls around. But if you look closely, there are plenty of local options for satisfying your sweet tooth. From the sweet, creamy yellow flesh of a Seckel pear, to the papery mahogany skin of the hazelnut, to the deep, dark brown of extra-dark, bittersweet chocolate, what winter’s offerings lack in bright color and flavor are made up for in richness and texture....

Seeding is Believing

I am restless behind my windows, and the garden beckons. But January always offers up slate-gray mornings and frosty nights, and though the winter solstice is behind us, I feel boxed in by these short days. As I gaze out at my streetlight-lit garden in the endless eventide, I decide that the only antidote is an armchair getaway. In a time like this, gardening catalogically has to suffice....

No Manual Required

I have always maintained that if you want to get to know someone infinitely better, all you need to do is meet their parents. This year, I’ve learned that you can gauge how someone feels about their parents by telling them that yours are building a house in your backyard. From the beginning, it was always the three of us: my mothers and me. I was raised by two delightfully stubborn women who have never let anyone determine their fate, whether that meant having a baby as a lesbian couple in 1984, opening Seattle’s first woman-owned coffee roastery, or countless other quietly subversive actions that have enabled our family to thrive. ...

Percolating Through the Generations

It was the late 1800s. In the midst of the internal violence of Colombia’s Thousand Days’ War, a group of daring muleteers, or arrieros, ventured south from Manizales to seek their fortunes in the unexplored lands bordered by modern-day Caldas, Risaralda, and Quindío: the fertile triangle of Colombia’s famous La Zona Cafetera — The Coffee Zone....

Defying Categorization

Plums. Apricots. Dehydrated limes. Dandelion greens. Rose hips. At Urban Family Brewing in Interbay, a wild array of ingredients make their way into the off-beat beers that are continually rotating through the taps....

Old Wines, New World

Tanjuli Winery nestles into the Rattlesnake Hills, just above the tiny town of Zillah in eastern Washington. The landscape here is rich — acres of fruit trees roll into rows of wine grapes, with farmstead homes scattered among them. Winemaker Tom Campbell and I pick our way across the graveled paths between vineyard blocks. I see globes of heavy, dark grapes on the vines ahead of us....

Always Growing

It’s a glorious late-September day on the slopes of Grandview in Washington’s beautiful Yakima Valley. A bright blue sky is streaked with wisps of cloud. Mount Adams and Mount Rainier gleam in the distance, and the hills all around are snuggled under a striped quilt of vineyards and orchards....

One Ingredient Three Ways: Dungeness Crab

The delicate but distinctive flavor of the Pacific Northwest's Dungeness crab combines winter's reality with summer's promise, making a perfect New Year's resolution....

Collins Family Orchard

Calvin Collins sports a Seattle Seahawks cap, and his hands are covered in a hard day’s work. He’s been up since five in the morning, caring for his trees, boxing fruit, and loading a large truck to take the produce to the orchard’s warehouse in Magnolia, where it will be stored in a cold room before going out for sale at farmers markets throughout the city....

Early to Rise

Before sunrise, nearly every day, brothers Kit and Jesse Schumann are at their new Stone Way bakery, Sea Wolf, elbow-deep in flour. Such is life when you’re a two-person bakery – and a popular one at that. The Schumanns' venture is barely three years old, but it has a cult following, with a legion of fans built by exposure in some of Seattle’s best restaurants....

Beer & Bivalves

A scant 10 minutes after stepping out of my car in Olympia, I’m already slurping raw oysters. My first stop on a road trip to Washington’s state capital is the Olympia Farmers Market, a year-round affair that bustles with shoppers selecting fresh produce, locally-raised meat, cut flowers, artisanal goods, and local crafts, against a backdrop of live music. The air at the market, situated about a block away from Puget Sound, smells deeply of seaweed and salt — rather like oysters....

Holidays on the Lamb

The last two months of the year are a time of celebration and giving thanks. Family and friends gather around the holiday table to reconnect and reminisce while enjoying a hearty meal together. When I was growing up, lamb often found its way onto our holiday table. An untraditional meal to many, lamb became our tradition, and to this day, the smell of lamb wafting through the house brings back all those memories of home and comfort....

Chelan County

Because Stemilt’s wines are naturally fermented — a finicky process that relies on the yeast naturally present on the grapes to ferment the juice — Jaime takes care to sanitize each cork before yanking it from the barrel so as not to compromise the wine inside....

From Grain to Glass

It’s still early on a recent Saturday night, but nearly all of the tables at Black Label Brewing Co. in downtown Spokane are already full. Of the brewery’s 15 beers listed on a chalkboard above a row of taps, two carry a special designation: insignias identifying them as Palouse Pints....

Growing Trust

Wine people love to speak of terroir – the influences of soil, climate, and terrain that distinguish grapes from a certain region. It’s what makes a Bordeaux a Bordeaux....

Seattle’s Serendipity

What you might not realize when buying a perfect cut of Kobe beef or a pint of raw milk from Mohamed Souaiaia's Kenmore wholesale meat shop is that its owner’s path is one of the most unlikely — and fascinating — you may ever hear....

From Farm to Food Bank

“It’s remarkable, I think, for reasons people don’t understand when they come to the market. They see the fish flying and the flowers and the great food, but what they don’t know about so much is the market’s commitment to serving the downtown community."...

Prepare Your Garden Beds Now for Winter

In late autumn, my gardening thoughts turn not to the seed, but to the ground. The philosopher, poet, and — perhaps most importantly — farmer Wendell Berry often refers to the soil, from which all life springs and returns....

Tomato Miso Bread With Holly Smith

Winter is a time most chefs hole up in kitchens and begin the joyful process of bread-baking and soup-making. The kitchen’s warmth and fresh aromas thaw our spirits and bring comfort as we settle in for the season....

A Treasure Trove of Truffles

It’s a chilly February morning, and we are out walking through the woods near Issaquah. A gauzy veil of wintry sunshine hangs like gossamer around the treetops, the forest smells damp and inviting, and Stella and Lidia, two adorably moptopped dogs, scamper through the undergrowth at breakneck speed, so excited and joyful that you can practically see the smiles on their faces....

The Proof is in the Parsnip

Perhaps you’ve heard the expression, “Fine words butter no parsnips.” In other words, flattery (“buttering up”) is meaningless without the behavior to back it up. A variation of sorts on “Don’t judge a book by its cover,” it's a particularly apt turn of phrase when speaking of parsnips, that humble root vegetable whose gnarled exterior is at odds with its creamy, sweet interior....

Carmenere

BY ANNE SAMPSON PHOTO BY BARBARA BEITO In every industry, business owners look for a way to stand out from the crowd. In the tech world, you develop the hottest new app – or the gadget to run it. Think Apple Watch. But if you grow wine grapes, you might have better luck with something old, maybe a little obscure. Something like Carmenere. That’s the path Dean Morrison followed at his Walla Walla vineyard, Morrison Lane. A bit of a contrarian, Morrison dedicated his vineyard to lesser-known grapes, like Counoise, Cinsault, and Barbera. He was one of the first in the Northwest to plant Syrah, in 1994, on four acres of his family’s farm. At the time, that grape was considered experimental in...

A Little Night Wine

An afternoon in Woodinville offers Seattle wine lovers plenty of exposure to Washington's finest vintages. But for a deeper appreciation of the terroir that fuels the flavors, consider a night sleeping in the vineyard. It's one of the most enjoyable ways to get intimate with your favorite wine....

Lavender

Lavender. It grows splendidly here in the Pacific Northwest, and we’ve all probably got a bush or two out in the yard — or know of friends who do. And yet we rarely, if ever, cook with it, which is a huge pity, as it is one of the most versatile of culinary herbs, with a slightly sweet taste and a distinctive fragrance that marries equally well with sweet and savory dishes. It can be used in many recipes as a less pungent substitute for its close cousin rosemary, and like rosemary, it pairs extremely well with citrus fruits of all kinds....

Hive Mind

Husband-and-wife team Paul and Pat Perkins are the only two employees at Seattle Urban Honey, but their workers number in the millions. At any given moment, their Green Lake backyard is literally buzzing with activity, their industrious crew producing a gentle hum as they y from buckwheat to borage and back to their four colorful hives....

A Plunge into Pungent Alliums

As pumpkins appear on porches, carved into grins, think about warding off vampires – but not by hanging a necklace of garlic across your shoulders. It would be better to spike some cloves into the ground....

Fall Roots

Get another crop underground now...

The Lure of Lummi

"So what is there to do on the island?" I hear a visitor ask the woman in front of me at her driver’s-side window. We’re waiting in line for the tiny, open-air car ferry to transport us to Lummi Island, just a five-minute ride from the small mainland terminal....

A Very British Picnic

Surprisingly, although the British summer is often non-existent, we Brits have a splendid repertoire of traditional summer foods...

One Cow Seven Courses

The new 4,000-square-foot Sevenbeef Steak House is an architectural marvel in Seattle's Central District. Floors have geothermal heat; sound-dampening material lines ceiling beams; and natural light pours in from every corner. Yet the real ingenuity is in the supply chain. The plan is to use locally raised, grass-fed, grass-finished beef. That is, the entire cow....

Sip Into This

Smasne Cellars blends award-winning winemaking with a historic lineage of vineyards to uncork its premium vine-to-cork creations....

Have it Your Whey

Cherry Valley Dairy churns natural, sustainable, healthy practices into every product it makes....

GRuB Digs In

Growing food is a vehicle for social change at an Olympia nonprofit....

Quinoa

Food trends have a way of coming on quick and fizzling out in much the same way...

Plotting Your Plat

On a nice day soon, I'll get down level with the soil and press my rake handle into it, creating a shallow furrow. Time for seeds to bring the garden back to life. But as I contemplate the future harvest, I focus on the past, too....

The Rebel Chef

Derek Ronspies isn’t afraid to tell it like it is. The Seattle chef and owner of Le Petit Cochon in Fremont is straight-talking, especially where his restaurant and its nose- to-tail, farm-to-table approach is involved....

Of Flora and Family

Spokane entrepreneur turns a small-batch yogurt hobby into a cultured business...

Plant a Radish

I am not a natural gardener. I didn’t grow up with carrots sprouting in the backyard. In fact, I looked with envy at my friends’ raised beds, with fence posts fashioned from driftwood logs and old fishing nets strung to keep the birds out...

Learning by Taste

It is easy to say that change is too difficult. But South Whidbey dug in — into the soil, that is....

Baked Lemon, Honey, and Rosemary Cheesecake

At this quiet time of year, when the earth is still sleeping and only a few green shoots remind us that we are about to tumble headlong into the madcap cacophony of spring, the pickings are slim when it comes to seasonal produce. Instead, this luscious baked cheesecake is a celebration of those cupboard ingredients that are so easy to take for granted here in the Pacific Northwest: fresh ricotta cheese from the farmers market, our astonishing local honeys, and new farm eggs -- all imbued with intriguing hints of the rosemary that grows like a weed in our backyards. If you can get Meyer lemons, they would work wonderfully, but ordinary lemons, such as I used here, are more than fine....

Mt. Townsend Creamery

Mt. Townsend Creamery’s cheeses are transporting. Seastack, a silvery tomme lush with mushroom and citrus notes, could have been pulled from the cellar of a French chateau....

Brrrrrrrrr!

When the temperatures drop, it’s time to turn to comfort menus and heartier dishes....

Sweeter After a Frost

Magenta hues brightened the ribs and veins of this January King cabbage as it experienced increasingly cold winter weather....

Beyond the IPA

Though it may seem a blasphemous omission for a Northwest brewery, you won’t find an IPA at Propolis Brewing in Port Townsend....

21 Acres

“When we choose to purchase and eat foods grown locally, seasonally, and organically, we support our local economy and create a livelihood for local family farmers that in many cases have been tending their lands for several generations,”...

Camping With Julia

“I would far prefer to have things happen as they naturally do, such as the mousse refusing to leave the mold, the potatoes sticking to the skillet, the apple charlotte slowly collapsing. One of the secrets of cooking is to learn to correct something if you can, and bear with it if you cannot.”...

Eat Well, Be Well

“He’s an extraordinary chef and food-service director, but he’s a better human being,” says Glenn. “His passion and sincerity about this is impossible to miss.”...

Farro for the Cold

Farro is part of a larger wheat family consisting of three ancient varieties: emmer, spelt, and einkorn....

No Till Farming

Karl Kupers’s twinkling blue eyes, easy grin, and tall lean stature might be expected on a Hollywood set but not in the wheat fields of eastern Washington. But there I was in Ritzville, Washington, with 50 others on the Shepherd’s Grain farm tour, listening to Karl’s rich, energizing voice resonate across the ever-so-gently-swaying golden fields....

Wild Abandon

Perhaps you’ve admired a perfect head of lettuce in your garden or a friend’s—the spray of burgundy speckles across the rounded whorls of soft green leaves. But have you seen it six months later?...

Going All In

How many of us have gazed out an office window and wondered whether we should be following our passions? Have you ever asked yourself what might happen if you ditched the nine-to-five job and lived your dream instead?...

Grain Country Spirits

With wheat growing in their front yard, a new crop of distillers is making their mark on eastern Washington....