Sweeter After a Frost

Magenta hues brightened the ribs and veins of this January King cabbage as it experienced increasingly cold winter weather....

Beyond the IPA

Though it may seem a blasphemous omission for a Northwest brewery, you won’t find an IPA at Propolis Brewing in Port Townsend....

Brrrrrrrrr!

When the temperatures drop, it’s time to turn to comfort menus and heartier dishes....

Camping With Julia

“I would far prefer to have things happen as they naturally do, such as the mousse refusing to leave the mold, the potatoes sticking to the skillet, the apple charlotte slowly collapsing. One of the secrets of cooking is to learn to correct something if you can, and bear with it if you cannot.”...

21 Acres

“When we choose to purchase and eat foods grown locally, seasonally, and organically, we support our local economy and create a livelihood for local family farmers that in many cases have been tending their lands for several generations,”...

Eat Well, Be Well

“He’s an extraordinary chef and food-service director, but he’s a better human being,” says Glenn. “His passion and sincerity about this is impossible to miss.”...

Farro for the Cold

Farro is part of a larger wheat family consisting of three ancient varieties: emmer, spelt, and einkorn....

No Till Farming

Karl Kupers’s twinkling blue eyes, easy grin, and tall lean stature might be expected on a Hollywood set but not in the wheat fields of eastern Washington. But there I was in Ritzville, Washington, with 50 others on the Shepherd’s Grain farm tour, listening to Karl’s rich, energizing voice resonate across the ever-so-gently-swaying golden fields....

Wild Abandon

Perhaps you’ve admired a perfect head of lettuce in your garden or a friend’s—the spray of burgundy speckles across the rounded whorls of soft green leaves. But have you seen it six months later?...

Going All In

How many of us have gazed out an office window and wondered whether we should be following our passions? Have you ever asked yourself what might happen if you ditched the nine-to-five job and lived your dream instead?...

Grain Country Spirits

With wheat growing in their front yard, a new crop of distillers is making their mark on eastern Washington....

Of Land and Sea

On Lopez Island, diversity is the key for Jones Family Farm...

Sol to Seed Farm

“I went out there and thought it was amazing,’” Matt says. “Even when I was just doing something mundane.”...

The Northwest Tea Festival

“Tea is the second most popular beverage in the world,” points out Rosanoff [the first being water]. “It’s changed and adapted to different cultures and that’s what is fun about it—to see Korean tea ceremony and Japanese tea ceremony next to each other.”...

Sorghum: The Versatile Grain You’ll Fall For

In our kitchen, the cooler months beg for pantry items that are versatile. I often find myself hunkering down a bit more than usual in the winter, as many of us do in Seattle, relying on old standbys like soups and stews, homemade bread, and roasted vegetables....

Helsing Junction Farm

The mission is simple: grow the most beneficial food possible — food that is integral to a healthy farming system, good for human health, full of flavor, and available to a wide range of people. Since Ujcic (pronounced you-jick) and Salafsky founded Helsing Junction in 1992 it has grown from five farmed acres to almost a hundred, and from 75 community supported agriculture (CSA) subscribers to more than a thousand, spanning from Lynnwood to Portland and out to the coast....

Reinventing the Beer Wheel

Jason Yerger started brewing beer out of desperation. When he was diagnosed with a gluten intolerance in 2007, the craft beer lover struggled to find anything on the market worth drinking....

Life at the Table

Ashley Rodriguez expected to fall in love with Italy. As an art student at Seattle Pacific University, she signed up to study abroad hoping to revel in a country steeped in art history. But it was the culture’s gastronomic influence—the gelato, the carbonara, the conversation, and long meals—that left a lasting mark. There was “something magic” that happened around the table in Italy....

Bites and Beers in Bellingham

I know locals who complain that Bellingham can’t keep an upscale restaurant alive. At one time there were several fine dining destinations, like Nimbus, Flats and Tivoli. In recent years those businesses have dwindled and in their place has come a Portland-like plethora of brewpubs, sandwich shops, and food trucks that seems to fit the town's casual approach....

Black Sheep Creamery

Early afternoon sunlight bounces off the white walls of the cheesemaking room at Black Sheep Creamery, making stacks of plastic buckets and the painted white cheese press glow....

Making Big Gin

Tucked away in a quiet corner of Ballard, Captive Spirits is one of a growing number of producers in the Northwest focused on spirits....

Sweet Dreams and Chocolate Cake

In Hot Cakes’ Ballard kitchen, the day starts and ends with cookies—salted peanut butter, s’mores, snickerdoodles, and perhaps the city’s best chocolate chip....

Bring on the Kiwi Berries

Every year Burnt Ridge, Dolan’s fruit- and nut-growing operation located east of Chehalis, harvests thousands of pounds of hardy kiwifruits from 200 cultivated vines—grown on trellises, not in the forest canopy. The wooden and wire bracing groans beneath the weight of the grape-sized, fuzzless fruits....

Bellewood Acres Distillery

“We bought 30 acres of perfect soil in a perfect setting with our three perfect farm hands—our children,”...

The Mother of All Condiments

This past fall I had the great fortune of teaching a quarter-long class on preserving to an eager audience of health-minded, highly educated individuals at Bastyr University. Using the prolific campus garden and taking cues from local farms, I built a thirteen-week course based solely on what was seasonally available to put up for the pantry. ...

Washington Rose’

How France’s Favorite Seasonal Wine Won Washington Over...

Apple Chutney/ Pumpkin Butter

In late fall, gardens heave a near audible final breath and give up the last of their fruits. Fields turn fragrant with the pungent smell from fermenting fallen fruit and the last of anything sweet is gathered from bare tree branches or browning vines....

Elderflower Syrup and Pickled Maple Blossoms

Last summer on the highway home from a long weekend at Lake Chelan, I pulled my car across three lanes of traffic when I spotted a tall slender tree hunched over by the weight of its small blue berries. I had noticed the same trees on the way out to the lake, but wasn't sure they were what I thought they were – elderberries....

The Back Story on Yeast

To the uninitiated, a sourdough starter sounds like a lousy co-pilot—it's a soupy mixture of flour and water, about the color and consistency of a melted milkshake. But to see it only for its parts is to miss the beauty of the whole....

Fran’s Chocolates

When Dylan Bigelow was twelve years old, he got his first job working for his mom. She founded Fran's Chocolates in 1982 and he helped out, doing a variety of odd jobs: putting candies in the little paper cups, wrapping up packages, or doing the dishes. That last job was a good one, because it included licking out the bowls....

Sunshine Roach

I first met Sunshine Roach at the Queen Anne Farmers Market. I was just finishing a chef demo of zucchini fritters and she was loitering by the front of my table, quietly observing me. I asked if she'd like to try a zucchini fritter that had already cooled on the plate, or wait for a hot, perfect batch that was still frying. She didn't hesitate to answer, "I'll wait." Girl after my own heart, I thought....

The Simple Art of Homemade Tortillas

Cooks who believe in the phrase "easy as pie" will have no problem when Cristina Zurita Ceniceros says that making flour tortillas is as simple as throwing together a pie crust....

OUR AVAs – Walla Walla

French fur traders settled in eastern Washington 150 years ago, in the region we now call the Palouse. Was it named for the grassland, waving in the breeze like a vast lawn? (In French, your lawn is la pelouse.)...

The Japanese Confections of Chika Tokara

Number 6208 is a modest white storefront tucked way back on Phinney Avenue. The gate at the sidewalk is draped with fluttering noren, the rectangular entry banners that signal when a Japanese shop is open. The front yard is a large rock garden, with a little maple tree and a wooden rake. The stillness of this place suits what is hidden inside: The rare Japanese confectionary outside of Japan....

Absinthe makes the heart grow fonder

Yeah, that wormwood—the intensely bitter herb that contains the noxious chemical thujone, widely believed to induce hallucinations and insanity. Wormwood also happens to be the main ingredient in absinthe, the controversial "green fairy" of bohemian Paris that supposedly drove Van Gogh to sever his ear…...

Madeleine Angevine

Grapes have been grown in the Puget Sound area since 1872, when Lambert Evans planted some on Stretch Island—but they were labrusca, or table grapes....

Locally Grown Pie

Pie matters. It's dessert, yes, which all by itself is enough to rate of high importance, but pie is also a symbol of just about everything that is good and true....

The Audacity of Hops

It's an alcoholic beverage, lovingly crafted by lifetime artisans, from the fruit of a vine grown in Eastern Washington. No two batches are the same....

The Beginners Fermentation Project: Ginger

Fermenting at home is easy, but the process is bound to leave beginners with questions unanswered. Beginners will get the best results with a starter culture specific to the project. Learn how to make Spiced Ginger Beet Relish and Fizzy Ginger Soda....

Adventures in Fermentation: Homemade Yogurt

BY AMY PENNINGTON When I was in elementary school, my mom packed my lunch every day. I wasn't one of those kids who glamorously got to wait in line for a hot lunch; I was the one with a grease-stained paper bag. On the very rare occasion, my mom would pack up a yogurt cup. I favored the kind with sweetened yogurt on top and jam-like fruit on the bottom. Thankfully, my taste buds have matured and the thought of pre-sweetened yogurt is cringe-inducing. And while I eat yogurt daily, I never considered making it at home until my friend Lynda eco-guilted me by pointing out my habit creates considerable waste from all the plastic yogurt containers I blow through. This simple...

Ayako and Family Jam

The quality of Gordon’s jam has the power to turn people nostalgic. “People say it reminds them of their grandmother’s jam, or spending time in the countryside picking fruit,” Gordon says. “I love to hear that people enjoy it—that helps keep me going.”...

Capitol Cider

Julie Tall has a motto, "Don't jump halfway across the ravine." In opening Capitol Cider, Seattle’s first cider-focused pub, in June of 2013, Tall made the jump, and a huge leap of faith as well....

Rise of the Rhone

The vineyards of Syncline Wine Cellars, where James Mantone grows the Rhone varietal Mourvèdre...

Jonboy Caramels

If there ever was an edible that embodied the principle of “less is more,” it’s Jonboy Caramels....

Skagit Malting

Skagit Malting is poised to change craft beer making...

Spirits in Yakima Valley

Like many Seattleites, most of my previous trips to the Yakima Valley centered on wine tasting. On a recent trip, the goal was no different. Wine tasting was first on our list. But as we soon discovered, the tasting opportunities don’t end with wine....

Nuts About You- The American Chestnut

In Europe, before the arrival of potatoes and corn from the New World, chestnuts were an essential starch. Chestnuts have been grown since prehistoric times, especially in the hilly, marginally fertile regions of Northern Italy and Southern France, where much of the land is difficult to till and plow....

DIY Holiday Gifting

Several holiday seasons ago, I decided to stop buying material gifts for family and friends and start making handmade presents....

Maninis Gluten Free

In March of 2011, Maninis joined Seattle's farmers markets community, selling mixes and pasta and breads at the Broadway and Phinney Ridge markets....

Sangiovese

finding a happy home for the 'blood of Jove'  BY SEAN P. SULLIVAN It is said that wine is the 'nectar of the gods.' If so, no wine could be closer in name and spirit to the heavens than Sangiovese, a grape whose name derives from the Latin sanguis Jovis—the blood of Jove, king of the gods. Sangiovese is unquestionably one of the world's great wine grape varieties. It is the most planted variety in Italy, the grape's homeland,...

Cool Season Abundance- Succession Planting

At long last, the first tomatoes are on the vine, the beans are coming in bushels, and friends are beginning to ooh and ahh over your burgeoning vegetable beds. So, what are you waiting for? Start planning for winter....

Sour Beers

The sour beer renaissance is upon us...

You Say Tomato

I have been a dedicated home canner for years and have preserved damn near everything for stockpiling the season—jams, chutneys, sauces, drinks, tuna—you name it. ...

A Pollinator Pathway

Along a swath of Columbia Street, thin strips of what used to be grass are now humming microcosms. Bees, moths, butterflies, and the occasional hummingbird flit from lavender flowers to columbines and trilliums, dutifully pollinating as they go....

Seaweed Camp

I’m hauling an 11-foot seaweed snake over the bow of my kayak and slicing off the blade with a pocket knife. Harvesting kelp blades in this fashion allows the seaweed to keep growing, making it truly 100% sustainable. “We’re giving it a haircut,” says Jennifer Adler, nutritionist, owner of Passionate Nutrition and founder and co-leader of our three-day Seaweed 101 adventure on Lopez Island....

C.B.’s Nuts

The deep, earthy-sweet smell of roasted nuts rushes at me as I open the door to the CB’s Nuts retail store outside of Kingston....

Adventures in Fermentation

When I was in elementary school, my mom packed my lunch every day. I wasn't one of those kids who glamorously got to wait in line for a hot lunch; I was the one with a grease-stained paper bag....

Arboreal Agriculture- The Beacon Food Forest

The seeds for the Beacon Food Forest were planted in 2009, in a Permaculture class led by Jenny Pell and Marisha Auerbach. As a final project, student groups planned installations using all they had learned about designing for sustainability....

We Will Rockwell

Willowood Farm—you have to practically wade through bald eagles to get there—is in the central, section of long, skinny Whidbey Island. These days, it’s as lovely a stretch of farmland as you could find driving through the Skagit Valley, but it’s also the farmland that almost wasn’t....

The Jig Is Up

Suddenly I feel the tug on the end of my line. A dull weight bends the tip of the pole down slightly. I pull my rod up in the air, reeling furiously, and go mad with joy, screaming out “I GOT ONE! I GOT ONE! SQUID ON THE LINE! HAHAHAHAHAHA” My neighbors are both slightly disturbed by my intensity and proud of me for my first ever squid....

OUR AVAs- Naches Heights

"Naches Heights" sounds like a housing tract, but it's actually a 13,000-acre agricultural plateau at the northwest corner of the Yakima Valley....

On The Marc in Walla Walla

"No way!" I replied, rather ungraciously, when Kyle Mussman, owner of the Marcus Whitman hotel in Walla Walla and its lovely restaurant The Marc, made me an outrageous offer. "A seven course no-carb Chef's Table tasting menu on a Saturday night? The chef's going to kill you!"...

OUR AVAs- Columbia Gorge

Columbia Gorge: scratching the surface BY RONALD HOLDEN For sheer size, the Columbia ranks fourth among North America's great rivers, behind the Mississippi, the Saint Lawrence, and the Mackenzie. It drains a basin that extends from the Rockies to the Pacific Ocean; it has twice the flow of the Nile, ten times as much as the Colorado. Some 150 miles from the sea, it courses through the Columbia Gorge,...

Plum Crazy

Together, plums and cherries make a happy marriage of texture and flavor: plums break down easily in cooking, and cherries hold their shape. They are both stone fruits, and maintain a slight almond essence that can be highlighted with a splash of brandy or kirsch....

Walla Walla Ooh La La!

Yearning for a taste of France minus the ten hour flight and the expensive air fare? "It's Walla Walla!" chorus a trio of French winemakers, all of whom live and make wine in the adorably-named town....

Farming Tea in Skagit Valley

Ask where tea comes from, and people imagine vast plantations in China, India, or Japan. But this common beverage doesn't have to possess such an exotic provenance: Washington's got its own, little-known, small-scale tea farm....

Maison Bleue Winery

The Pursuit of Passion, Perfection and Peace of Mind at Maison Bleue...

Rachel’s Ginger Beer

Take it from one who's been teetotal for years: tasty non-alcoholic options are few in Seattle bars. That shortage was one of the first things Rachel Marshall noticed when she returned home in 2008, after five years of working in the German resort town of Garmisch-Partenkirchen...

Send in the Shrubs

Several summers ago I stayed on my friend Lynda's farm in the Methow Valley. As expected in eastern Washington, the long summer days saw temperatures climbing and without air conditioning (we were on a farm, after all) we suffered through the stifling heat by moving slowly and wearing sun hats. In the evenings, we would sit on the porch and sip yuzu vinegar with a splash of sparkling water and a glass full of ice. It was Lynda's trick for keeping cool and while the first sip was bracing, the second was nothing short of refreshing. An addiction was born....

Asian Greens Demystified

We have the great fortune of mild weather here in the Pacific Northwest and while wearing a wool sweater in July is never fun, the gentle temperatures do help prolong a growing season that can last all year long....

Pike Brewing Company

If you're walking down the hallway that leads south from the old Economy Market Building toward Union Street, and you notice a man in rubber boots banging on a giant red silo with a big wooden oar, get closer and start sniffing: you've arrived at The Pike Brewing Company when the brewers are working....

Quillisascut Farm

Quillisascut means different things to different people. To some it's a farm nestled in the hills of northeastern Washington, to others it's an artisanal goat cheese served at restaurants across the state. Quillisascut is also a farm-to-table school, one that often leaves participants with a profoundly different perspective on the connection between land, plate, and community....

OUR AVAs – Snipes Mountain

Mount Adams presides in the western distance as you drive through the Yakima Valley. A great arc of sky connects the hills that form its boundaries like crumpled blankets: Rattlesnake to the north, Horse Heaven to the south....

The Chardonnay Paradox

Why America's Favorite Grape Struggles to Find Its Way in Washington BY SEAN P. SULLIVAN PHOTOS BY CAROLE TOPALIAN Chardonnay is a grape of many contradictions. On the one hand, it creates some of the world's most sought after and expensive wines; on the other, it creates some of the cheapest and most abominable plonk. Some consumers revel in the grape. In fact Chardonnay dominates the U.S wine market at 20% of all wines sold (Cabernet Sauvignon is a distant second at 12%). Others revile the wine. When I recently asked a friend what advice he would give consumers about Chardonnay, he responded drolly, "Look elsewhere." He is not alone in that assessment. Why do so many consumers love Chardonnay while others love to hate...

Brennon Leighton, winemaker

From bus boy to punk rocker to one of Washington’s top winemakers, Brennon Leighton’s path has been a winding one. Equal parts passionate, outspoken, and honest, Leighton is poised to make a large impression on the Washington wine industry. Ironically, he is doing it by trying to leave as little impression on his wines as possible....

Deluxe Foods

Rebecca Staffel can't contain her glee. "These are so pretty!" she declares, surveying simmering kettles of fleshy pink fruit. Deluxe Foods inaugural batch of Fig Preserves with Star Anise is off to a fragrant, promising start....

OUR AVAs- Yakima Valley

Even before modern agriculture, the Yakima Valley was a bountiful land. In one of the many Native American dialects of central Washington, the word E-ya-ki-ma means “well-fed people.”...

Carrot Jam Sweet & Spicy Carrots

Winter is a great time of year to tackle a kitchen project that will both add to the pantry shelves and bring a little color to the gray days. While there isn't much local produce available over winter, carrots are a cold-weather standout, and a fabulously flexible vegetable—equally tasty in both sweet and savory dishes....

The Third Pomme- Quince

Whence the quince—so beautifully ripe, organic, and local to the Puget Sound region? It's from an island farm of odd fruits. Guemes Island, Idaho, Iran, and the Garden of Eden hold in common what is thought to have been the forbidden fruit in Paradise: not an apple, but rather the quince....

A Very Dainty Jelly

My grandma was a Depression era farm girl turned career woman, who went from home-canned veggies and burlap skivvies to high heels, high efficiency and a love of Betty Crocker instant cakes and Marie Callendar frozen pies....

Charlie Bodony / Some Like it Hott

Charlie Bodony's spice business began as part experiment, part backyard hobby, and part homage to his Transylvanian heritage. Bodony grows the peppers for his blossoming company, Some Like It Hott, in his Port Townsend backyard. There, in two greenhouses behind the garage, is where the magic starts....

Sparkling Wines from Domaine St. Michelle

The Burien pub is airy and inviting, and Elliott Bay's head brewer Doug Hindman's affable attitude suggests that the complex brewing system he manages brings him more joy than stress. "Craft brewers are generally a pretty agreeable lot," he says, and not surprisingly, I find myself agreeing with him....

OUR AVAS- Lake Chelan

During the long summer days, Lake Chelan acts as a collector of heat, which it then radiates back into the vineyards. In winter, the phenomenon protects the vineyards from frost....

Adventures in Tofu

The first time my husband made us tofu, one of the (many) things I could not figure out, was how he had mysteriously caused the soy milk to thicken....